Iowa State College (now University) was the site of the first Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit in the country. Established in 1932, the collaboration between the Iowa Fish and Game Commission (DNR) and Iowa State predated, by three years, the national cooperative program between Iowa State, eight other universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Biologic Survey. In 1941 the unit expanded to include fisheries research.

One of the first accomplishments of the fishery unit, directed by first unit leader Reeve M. Bailey, was the establishment of an Iowa State fish survey, which today’s fishermen will find easily accessible in its online form. Following Bailey, Kenneth Carlander served for nearly two decades as the second unit leader of the unit. During Carlander’s tenure, ISU offered two fishery-related graduate degrees: Fisheries Management (1947) and Fishery and Wildlife Management (1963). Carlander also had students in his “Principles in Fish Management” class take a census of fish in Lake Laverne.

1962 guest book for the Iowa Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Click to enlarge. (RS 9/10/4, box 4, folder 10)

1962 guest book for the Iowa Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Click to enlarge. (RS 9/10/4, box 4, folder 10)

The program has had international impact, drawing both students and visitors from around the world, as well as exchanging knowledge and informing practice in multiple countries.

Read More…

Posted by: Kim | May 12, 2015

CyPix: Weighing Duroc Pigs

A. W. Dahlgran work with an FFA high school student on his Duroc pig project. Undated. (University Photographs RS 9/6/F box 544)

A. W. Dahlgran works with a high school student on his Duroc pig project. Undated. (University Photographs RS 9/6/F box 544)

The caption on the back of the photograph reads:

Those preparing to teach vocational agriculture assist high school pupils to improve their home projects as part of their training program. This agricultural education student, A. W. Dahlgran, left, is assisting one of his pupils in the weight of his Duroc Pigs at weaning time. An analysis of these weight records shows the value of management practices followed. The modern movable type hog house was built in the high school farm mechanics class from plans secured from Iowa State College.

Fun fact: the champion boar raised last year on the Allen E. Christian Swine Teaching Farm was a Duroc!

The teacher education program in agricultural life sciences is one of the older programs on campus. Begun in 1911, as part of Agricultural Education, the program prepares educators for teaching high school agriculture as well as other career options. Special Collections has many photographs of student teachers working with FFA (formerly “Future Farmers of America”) and other agriculture students in University Photographs RS 9/6. Here is a sampling of some of our collections related to swine, swine husbandry, and agricultural education:

  • 4-H Youth Development Records (RS 16/3/4)
  • Iowa Hog Cholera Eradication Committee Records (MS 202)
  • Iowa Pork Producer’s Association Records (MS 158)
  • J. Marion Steddom Papers (RS 21/7/65)
  • National Swine Grower’s Council Records (MS 235)
  • Paul C. Taff Papers (RS 16/3/56)
Posted by: Whitney | May 8, 2015

National Agri-Marketing Association

Another collection is now available for research in Special Collections and University Archives! The National Agri-Marketing Association Records, MS 540, contains the administrative files, conference and event materials, and chapter files of the non-profit professional organization. The collection includes correspondence, meeting minutes, committee records, directories, clippings, conference records, newsletters, chapter reports, photographs, negatives, slides, videotapes, an audio reel, and audiocassettes.

Meeting on women's role in agri-marketing, or "How to Succeed in Agri-Business - Without Being a Man," 1981 circa. Box 41, Folder 29.

Meeting on women’s role in agri-marketing, or “How to Succeed in Agri-Business – Without Being a Man,” 1981 circa. Box 41, Folder 29.

One of the biggest roles of NAMA (est. 1957) is to put on conferences and other professional development events for its members – agri-marketing professionals and students. Their first seminar, “Farmarketing,” was held in 1960 in Chicago, back when the organization was called the Chicago Area Agricultural Advertising Association. Since then, the Agri-Marketing Conference has been held every year all around the United States. Other events they have held include the Outlook Conference, the Marketing Management Conference, the Issues Forum, and various tours and short courses, information and photos of which can be found throughout the collection (see Series 2 in the finding aid).

I want to know why there is a robot in this photo as much as you do. Agri-Marketing Conference, 1981 or 1982. Box 41, Folder 18.

Agri-Marketing Conference, 1981 or 1982 (I want to know why there is a robot in this photo as much as you do). Box 41, Folder 18.

Enjoying a golf outing at the 1984 Agri-Marketing Conference. Box 41, Folder 24.

Enjoying a golf outing at the 1984 Agri-Marketing Conference. Box 41, Folder 24.

More information can be found in the collection, along with images, audio, and video. Related collections include National Agri-Marketing Association. Iowa Chapter Records (MS 57), National Agri-Marketing Association. Midwest Chapter Records (MS 64), National Agri-Marketing Association. Missouri/Kansas Chapter Records (MS 83), and National Agriculture Day Records (MS 66), all of which are worth seeing if this new collection strikes your fancy. Stop by sometime!

Posted by: bishopae | May 5, 2015

CyPix: moving up

It’s that time of year again! The time for donning caps and gowns if you are a senior, or if not, at least setting aside those textbooks and pencils for a nice …bonfire. A beanie bonfire, to be exact.

Photograph of a large freshman beanie replica burning in the bonfire during the Moving Up Ceremony, 1926. University Photograph Collection box 1702.

A large freshman beanie replica burns in the bonfire during the Moving Up Ceremony, 1926. University Photograph Collection box 1702.

From 1916 to 1934, freshmen at Iowa State College were required to wear “freshmen beanies” or “prep caps”  on campus. After suffering through a year of harassment that the caps brought upon them, freshman were quite happy to ditch them at the end of the year. Beginning in 1923, students held a mock-graduation, the Moving Up Ceremony, during VEISHEA celebrations, at which time seniors became alumni and everyone else moved up a grade. The freshmen burned their beanies in a roaring bonfire. By 1934, the caps were no longer worn and the moving up ceremony faded due to lack of interest.

We’re lucky to have a surviving beanie in the University Archives at ISU. It belonged to Robert W. Breckenridge. Robert saved his freshman beanie from 1918 instead of burning it, and it now resides in the archives.

Freshman beanie belonging to Robert W. Breckenridge, circa 1918. From University Archives Artifact Collection, 2002-189. It even has it's own fancy box and hat stand!

Freshman beanie belonging to Robert W. Breckenridge, from 1918. From University Archives Artifact Collection, 2002-189. It even has it’s own fancy box and hat stand!

More images of the Moving Up Ceremony can be found in the Student Life album on our Flickr page.

(Note: A correction was made to an earlier version of this post. The earlier version had misidentified a felt hat belonging to Iris Macumber (RS 21/7/228) as a freshman beanie. Oops! Freshmen beanies were required for men only. This hat shown above is a true example of the freshman beanie, and the photograph and information has been updated and corrected.)

Posted by: Kim | May 1, 2015

Happy 20th birthday Reiman Gardens!

Bird house in Reiman Gardens (RS 5/7/3/0/5, box 1, folder 1)

Bird house in Reiman Gardens (RS 5/7/3/0/5, box 1, folder 1)

 

Educate, enchant, and inspire an appreciation of plants, butterflies, and the beauty of the natural world.

– Reiman Gardens Mission Statement

Reiman Gardens turns 20 this year. The university’s old horticultural garden (est. 1914), the predecessor to Reiman Gardens, was greatly expanded and moved to its present location to serve as an attractive entrance to the Iowa State University campus. Construction began in 1994 and the garden was officially dedicated on September 16, 1995.

Reiman Gardens is the largest public garden in Iowa.

Read More…

Posted by: Kim | April 28, 2015

CyPix: Jamming with Floyd

We’ve arrived at the end of Jazz Appreciation Month, so I thought it would be nice to draw attention to the Floyd Bean Papers (MS 55). Bean was a jazz pianist from east central Iowa (Ladora and Grinnell). His first professional gig was playing with fellow Iowan, Bix Beiderbecke. However, his big break came in 1939 when he joined Bob Crosby’s band full-time. Throughout the rest of his life, Bean played and recorded with many other jazz musicians as well as composed his own music.

Below is an image of a jam session Bean (not pictured) had with two members of the Duke Ellington orchestra.

Joe

Joe “Tricky Sam” Nanton (bottom left) and Johnny Hodges (top) jam with Floyd Bean in the Panther Room (Chicago). (MS 55, box 3, folder 5)

“Trickey Sam” & Johnny Hodges – Help make Duke Ellington’s Band – Just before “Pearl Harbor” “41”.. Floyd was on Piano – Panther Rooom – Chi. Jam Session – (Harry Lim sponsor)

[all sic] – transcript of the note on the back of the “Tricky Sam” photo (bottom)

The collection contains Bean’s own arrangements and musical compositions, photographs of Bean and other jazz musicians (including personally addressed photos from Cleo Brown, Sidney “Big Sid” Catlett, and Earl Hines) and a variety of other kinds of materials documenting jazz and jazz musicians. It’s a great resource for Jazz Appreciation Month. We’d love to have you stop by and take a look! Also, be sure and listen to Iowa State’s own jazz band some time.

Posted by: bishopae | April 24, 2015

Earth Day: Louis Pammel and Iowa state parks

Iowa was one of the first states in the United States to adopt a state park system, and it did so in large part due to the efforts of Iowa State professor of botany Louis H. Pammel.

Louis Pammel (right) with Carl Fritz Henning, custodian at Ledges State Park, 1926.

Louis Pammel (right) with Carl Fritz Henning, custodian at Ledges State Park, 1926.

In 1917, the Iowa General Assembly created the State Board of Conservation for the purpose of making recommendations for acquiring land for state parks and to administer the parks. Pammel served as the Board’s first chairman from 1918-1927. Under his tenure, Iowa acquired 38 state parks.

Pamphlet, "State Parks of Iowa," RS 13/5/13, Box 76, Folder 8.

Pamphlet, “State Parks of Iowa,” RS 13/5/13, Box 76, Folder 8 (click for larger image)

In an article titled, “Iowa Keeps Nature’s Gift: What the State is Doing to Preserve Plant Life and Scenic Beauties,” Pammel makes a case for the beauty of the Iowa landscapes set aside in state parks:

Photo of Palisades on the Cedar River in Linn County, later Palisades-Kepler State Park, Box 51, Folder 4a.

Photo of Palisades on the Cedar River in Linn County, later Palisades-Kepler State Park, RS 13/5/13, Box 51, Folder 4a.

We think of a park as a place where there are trees like the maple and the basswood or the stately elm and the sycamore or white pine and cedar, the oak and the ash and they are all beautiful, but let [us] not forget that in Iowa at least we should have pride in the Prairie Park where the lily and gentian, the golden rod and aster, the blue stem and the switch grass, the pasque flower and Johnny-jump-up vie with each other in brilliant array, for it is to the prairie that we owe all of our greatness as a corn state. (Louis H. Pammel Papers, RS 13/5/13, Box 41, Folder 4)

More than just beauty, however, Pammel was concerned with the resources state parks offered for science, history, and recreation:

The persons who framed the [Iowa state park] law had in mind the preservation of animals, rare plants, unique trees, some unique geological formations, the preservation of the Indian mounds, rare old buildings where Iowa history was made….The framers of this law wished to show generations yet unborn what Iowa had in the way of prairie, valley, lake and river. It was felt that a part of this heritage left to us was not only for the present generations, but that its citizens of the future had a just claim on this heritage. (Box 41, Folder 6)

Program from the dedication of Pammel State Park, 1930. Box 76, Folder 8.

Program from the dedication of Pammel State Park, 1930. RS 13/5/13, Box 76, Folder 8.

On June 30, 1930, Pammel’s contributions to Iowa state parks were honored with the re-dedication of Devil’s Backbone State Park near Winterset in Madison County as Pammel State Park.

Celebrate Earth Day by visiting an Iowa state park or other state park near you. Find out more about Pammel’s fascinating life (including his interactions with ISU alum George Washington Carver!) in the Louis Hermann Pammel Papers, RS 13/5/13.

 

Posted by: Kim | April 21, 2015

CyPix: A 19th century view on books and reading

Letters to Young Ladies, by Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, Hartford : Wm. Watson, 1835. (Special Collections LC1441 .S58 1835)

Letters to Young Ladies, by Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, Hartford : Wm. Watson, 1835. (Special Collections LC1441 .S58 1835)

When intercourse with living becomes irksome, or insipid, summon to your side the departed spirits of the mighty dead. Would you think it an honor to be introduced in the presence of princes and prelates, or to listen to the voice of Plato or Socrates? Close the door of your reading-room, and they congregate around you. (page 94)

April 23rd is World Book and Copyright Day which is a day to “to recognise the power of books to change our lives for the better and to support books and those who produce them” (UNESCO).

Above is one of the books in Special Collections – an 1835 set of “letters” to young women, advising them on a variety of topics. The image above links to Mrs. Sigourney’s thoughts on books and reading. Here in Special Collections we acquire books that are rare and/or support the teaching and research areas of Iowa State University. To find books in Special Collections, use the library’s Quick Search and change the drop-down box for “all items” to “Books and more.” Once your search results appear, filter the list by choosing “PARKS Special Collections” under “collection” on the left side of the screen.

To see more of our blog posts on our book collection, choose “rare books” from the categories drop-down on the right of this page.

Happy reading!

Note: images and descriptions in the following may be distressing to readers.

Holocaust Remembrance Day – or Yom HaShoah – was just this week (April 16th). Every year, it is commemorated on the 27th day of the month of Nisan in the Jewish calendar, which correlates to sometime in April or May in the Gregorian calendar, depending on the year. Another remembrance day, International Holocaust Remembrance Day, is held on January 27th and commemorates the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau. Yom HaShoah is largely observed in Israel and in Jewish communities throughout the world and marks the anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Considering the tragedy that was the Holocaust and the lessons that were learned from it, more than one recognized day of observance seems justified.

It might be a surprise to learn that we in the Special Collections Department at ISU have materials related to the Holocaust. Admittedly, there’s not much, but what we do have is certainly interesting.

Read More…

Posted by: Kim | April 14, 2015

CyPix: a robot beverage service

Iowa State has its own celebrity robot. CyBot, the famous robot in question, once poured Alan Alda a drink on national television.

Cybot pouring water from a Mountain Dew can. (RS 11/1/8 box 10, folder 28)

Cybot pouring water from a Mountain Dew can. (RS 11/1/8 box 10, folder 28)

In 1996, seniors in the Electrical and Computer Engineering program developed Iowa State University’s first interactive robot as part of their Senior Design class. Cybot, at a height of 6 feet and a weight of between 200 and 460 pounds (sources disagree), was a mobile robot equipped with sonar and speech capabilities.

Cybot was programmed to find its way around a room and offer people it met a drink, which it then poured and served. Cybot uses sonar (sound waves) to find obstacles and avoid them and to find potential drink customers. It is fully autonomous, has rudimentary intelligence, and it communicates by voice.

A library of acceptable user commands guides Cybot’s actions, and it answers by voice as well. “If Cybot asks ‘Would you like something to drink?’ and you say ‘No thank you,’ it moves on. If you say ‘Yes, please,’ it will pour you a Coke,” Patterson said.

– “Spotlight Shining on Iowa State’s Cybot,” Iowa State Daily, September 3, 1996.

Two students calibrate CyBot. (Engineering Communications, RS 11/1/8)

Two students calibrate CyBot. (Engineering Communications, RS 11/1/8)

Learn more about CyBot in the Engineering Communications records (RS 11/1/8).

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