Posted by: Rachel | April 21, 2016

Military Circus #TBT @CycloneROTC

The first Military Circus at Iowa State University was held on March 4, 1922. It was held annually, with some exceptions, until approximately 1941.

Boys, Military Service in Armory, March 7, 1925 (University Photographs box 1112)

Boys, Military Service in Armory, March 7, 1925 (University Photographs box 1112)

To learn more about the history of the Department of Military Science, drop by the reading room and check out the Department of Military Science Subject Files and other related collections! We’re open Monday – Friday 10-4.

Posted by: Whitney | April 19, 2016

Notable Women of ISU: Barbara Forker

It’s time for our third installment of Notable Women of ISU! This time we’re going to take a look at physical education expert Barbara Forker. Some of you may know her only as the namesake of the Barbara E. Forker Building, or “Forker” as it’s commonly called. The building, originally the Physical Education for Women (PEW) Building, was renamed in her honor in 1997. Let’s shed some light on why this building was named after her.

Barbara Forker speaking at the Forker Building dedication, 1997. [photo location]

Barbara Forker speaking at the Forker Building dedication, 1997. RS 10/7/13, Box 26, Folder 2

Born in 1920 in Kendallville, Indiana, Dr. Forker earned a B.S. (1942) from Eastern Michigan University, a M.S. (1950) from Iowa State College (University), and a Ph.D. (1957) from the University Michigan. Dr. Forker worked at Iowa State in some capacity from 1948 until her retirement in 1990, beginning as a temporary instructor and eventually becoming Emeritus Professor. She served as Head of the Women’s Physical Education Department from 1958-1974, and was the first Head of the Department of Physical Education (the men’s and women’s departments combined) from 1974-1986.

Barbara Forker, 1955. [photo location]

Barbara Forker, 1955. University Photographs, RS 10/7/A, Box 782

Throughout her career, Dr. Forker was active in many organizations and projects. She served as advisor for NAIADS (synchronized swimming team at Iowa State) and “I” Fraternity (honorary for outstanding women athletes). She was president of the Iowa Association of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (IAHPER), the Central District Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (CDAHPER), and the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (AAHPER). She was active in several other organizations as well, and was a member of three professional fraternities.

Barbara Forker and President Gerald Ford, signed by President Ford, circa 1977. [photo location]

Barbara Forker and President Gerald Ford, signed by President Ford, circa 1977. RS 10/7/13, Box 25, Folder 2

In addition to presenting over 100 speeches and receiving several awards for her work, Dr. Forker notably worked with the United States Olympics from 1975-1984. She was a member of the President’s Commission on Olympic Sports and in 1977 served as a United States Delegate in the Second Educationists Session at the International Olympic Academy. From 1980 to 1984, she was a member of the United States Olympic Committee Executive Board and the United States Olympic Committee Education Council. In her last year with the Olympics, she was Chairman of the United States Olympic Committee Symposium at the Pre-Olympic Scientific Congress.

For more information about Dr. Forker and her impressive career, come in and have a look at the Barbara Ellen Forker Papers, RS 10/7/13. A couple other items of interest are this online feature from Iowa State University’s sesquicentennial celebration and this Women’s History Month blog post we did four years ago. Stop by sometime!

 

Posted by: Rachel | April 14, 2016

Fashion Show #TBT @ISUFashionShow

Last Saturday was the 34th annual Fashion Show. The picture below is from the first Fashion Show in 1982.

1982 Fashion Show (from Fashion Show Records RS 29/2/4 box 1)

1982 Fashion Show (from Fashion Show Records RS 29/2/4 box 1)

 

The Fashion Show is one of the largest fashion shows run by students in the United States. More than 150 student-designed garments are featured on the runway and in the exhibitions.

Drop by the reading room and look at the Fashion Show Records (RS 29/2/4). We’re open Monday-Friday 10-4!

Posted by: Amy | April 12, 2016

National Poetry Month: Ada Hayden

Ada Hayden in College pasture, 1926. RS 13/3/33, Box 4, Folder 4.

Ada Hayden in College pasture, 1926. RS 13/3/33, Box 4, Folder 4.

If you are from Ames, chances are you’ve heard of Ada Hayden. You’ve probably taken a walk through Ada Hayden Heritage Park, or you may have visited the Ada Hayden Herbarium on ISU campus. “But Poetry Month?” you may be thinking. “Ada Hayden?”

Hayden was born in 1884 in Ames, IA, and attended Iowa State College (University), where she worked closely with Professor of Botany Louis Pammel. She graduated in 1908 with a B.S. in Botany and later became the first woman to receive a Ph.D. from Iowa State in 1918. She spent her career at ISC as an Assistant Professor of Botany and was named Curator of the Herbarium from 1947 until her death in 1950. As curator, she collected and preserved plant specimens, but she also had spent much time drawing many botanical illustrations and photographing plants in their native habitats. She spent much of her later career working for the preservation of the few remaining native prairie areas in the state, and Hayden Prairie in Howard County is named in her honor.

Rosa arkansana (Prairie Rose), Ada Hayden Digital Collection.

Rosa arkansana (Prairie Rose), Ada Hayden Digital Collection.

While she is best known for her work in prairie preservation, she also did quite a bit of writing. Most of her writings were articles on botany or prairie preservation, but in her Papers here in the University Archives is one rather lovely poem titled “The Iowa Rose.” It begins,

Beyond the Mississippi

Where the slow Missouri flows,

In the land of the Des Moines river

There blooms the Iowa Rose;

Not in the early springtime,

Not when the gold leaves fall,

But the summer’s radiant sunshine

The rose from the rosebud calls.

You can read the entire poem by clicking on the image below.

"The Iowa Rose" by Ada Hayden, undated. RS 13/5/55, box 1/folder 22.

“The Iowa Rose” by Ada Hayden, undated. RS 13/5/55, box 1/folder 22.

You can see slides of Hayden’s plant specimens in our Digital Collections. To see what else can be found in her papers, check out the collection’s finding aid.

Posted by: Rachel | April 8, 2016

Beaux Arts Ball #TBT @ISUDesign

Beaux Arts Ball 1953

Beaux Arts Ball 1953 (University Photographs box 1649)

The Department of Architecture used to host a Beaux Arts Ball in the 1940s and 1950s. The College of Design rekindled it in 1999 to celebrate the college’s 20th anniversary. Check out articles from Designnews  1999 (p. 10)  and  2000 (p. 33)  to read more about the Beaux Arts Balls from those years.

The Graduate Students in Architecture currently host a Beaux Arts ball in the spring for members, friends and faculty.

The Beaux Arts Ball originated from an annual ball called the Bal des Quat’z’Arts  held by  students of the École of Beaux-Arts in Paris in the spring from the 1890s. The Beaux Arts Ball came to New York City in the 1920s and was used by the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design as a fundraiser. Since then a variety of organizations have used the ball as a fundraiser or fun activity for its members.

Watch this video on YouTube to learn more about the history of the Beaux Arts Ball.

Stop by the reading room to see more photographs from Beaux Arts Balls in the past or other fun activities hosted by Iowa State student organizations. We’re open Monday-Friday 10-4.

 

 

Posted by: Rachel | April 6, 2016

Educating Farmers on Educational Trains

Amy Bishop, rare books and manuscript curator, at our exhibit table in the Iowa State Capitol's rotunda for Silos & Smokestacks Legislative Showcase.

Amy Bishop, rare books and manuscript curator, at our exhibit table in the Iowa State Capitol’s rotunda for Silos & Smokestacks Legislative Showcase.

Yesterday my colleague Amy Bishop & I attended the Silos & Smokestacks Annual Partner Site Meeting & Legislative Showcase in Des Moines. There are 115 partner sites that constitute Silos & Smokestacks National Heritage Area (SSNHA) and all of the partner sites preserve and tell the story of American agriculture in some way. National Heritage Areas are places designated by Congress where natural, cultural, and historic resources combine to tell a story that celebrates our nation’s diverse heritage. Special Collections & University Archives are a partner site for SSNHA.

We attended educational sessions in the morning and in the afternoon we put on a tabletop exhibit about a website created during a summer internship, Reflections on ISU Extension, that was funded by an SSNHA grant in 2014. The intern developed a digital collection and contributed to the design of its accompanying website. The collection offers a look into the early work of the Extension Service, its role in the education of farmers, and the impact it had on agricultural advancement and production. It is composed of documents, photographs, and select media.

One of the neatest things I learned from browsing through this digital collection was about the educational trains. The university (known then as Iowa Agricultural College and Model Farm) sent instructors on trains throughout the state to teach classes on seed corn and other agriculture related topics of interest to Iowa’s farmers such as crops, livestock, and home economics.

 

Educational Trains. 1905. J. W. Jones speaking. M. L. Mosher helping. Audience in coach listens to a talk on producing better corn. Note the Holden sawdust corn testing box, a method by which 6 kernels of corn from each seed ear could be tested. Audience advised to plant only ears that tested six kernels strong.

Educational Trains. 1905. J. W. Jones speaking. M. L. Mosher helping. Audience in coach listens to a talk on producing better corn. Note the Holden sawdust corn testing box, a method by which 6 kernels of corn from each seed ear could be tested. Audience advised to plant only ears that tested six kernels strong.

 

On the Hog train. Snyder speaking soils man, ca. 1910s.

On the Hog train. Snyder speaking soils man, ca. 1910s.

 

Read more about the history of ISU Extension here: http://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/documents/ISUExt_History.pdf or view the Reflections on ISU Extension digital collection. You can always stop by and see original documents and photographs documenting the work of Extension or other collections related to agriculture. We’re open Monday-Friday 10-4.

Posted by: Rachel | March 31, 2016

Track and Field Throwback Thursday #TBT

This weekend the Iowa State University’s Track and Field teams (@CycloneTrackXC) are heading to Northern California for meets (click here for further details). In light of a busy upcoming April full of track and field events , this week’s #TBT pictures are blasts from our Track and Field’s past.

The Iowa State University Men’s Track and Field program has a history that goes back to 1905.

Jumping hurdles at a Men’s Track & Field meet ca. 1906 (University Photographs box 1948)

Women’s Track and Field began at Iowa State University in 1974. The Track and Field program features many indoor and outdoor sports including, but not limited to, sprints, relays, hurdles, long and high jumps, shot put, and discus.

Jumping hurdles at a Women’s Track & Field meet 1988 (University Photographs box 2032)

Drop by our reading room to check out more Iowa State University sports photographs! We’re open Monday – Friday from 10-4.

 

 

 

Posted by: Amy | March 30, 2016

Ex libris Charles Atwood Kofoid

Bookplate, reads "Ex-libris Charles Atwood Kofoid" in Geographische Geschichte des Menschen.

Bookplate, reads “Ex-libris Charles Atwood Kofoid” in Geographische Geschichte des Menschen.

Occasionally we come across a book with an interesting provenance, or history of ownership, that we didn’t know we had. Recently our reference specialist came upon a book in our collections with the bookplates of Charles Atwood Kofoid. A quick Google search informed her that Kofoid was an American zoologist of some note.

Kofoid (1865-1947) was a zoologist at University of California, Berkeley. He classified many new species of marine protozoans, and he was an early supporter of the creation of a marine station in La Jolla, California, first called the Marine Biological Association of San Diego, which later became Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He served as the assistant director at Scripps from 1903-1923. His papers are held at University of California, San Diego and the Bancroft Library at University of California, Berkeley. For photographs of Kofoid, see UC San Diego’s digital collection.

The title page and bookplate of Geographische Geschichte des Menschen.

The title page and bookplate of Geographische Geschichte des Menschen.

And the book? It is a copy of Geographische Geschichte des Menschen, und der allgemein verbreiteten vierfüssigen thiere : nebst einer hieher gehörigen zoologischen weltcharte by Eberhardt August Wilhelm von Zimmermann, published in Leipzig, Germany, in 1778 (call number: QL711 Z65g). It is a work of zoogeography, a field that studies the geographical distribution of animals.  Zimmerman was a German geographer and zoologist who traveled widely throughout Europe and was one of the first to publish books in this field.

Now comes the question, how do we happen to have this particular book in our collections? While we don’t have detailed records of all our acquisitions, a clue comes from the biography of Kofoid. He was born in Iowa’s neighboring state of Illinois, and worked for a number of years (1897-1903) as superintendent of the Illinois River Biological Station. Following that, in 1904-1905, he traveled with Alexander Agassiz on the Albatross Expedition as a planktonologist. Perhaps before his travels, he sold off some of his books, and this title made its way into the collections of Iowa State University Library.

Posted by: Whitney | March 24, 2016

All About Puppies #TBT

You may have missed it, but yesterday was National Puppy Day. Yes, there is a national day for puppies. Why shouldn’t there be? Just look at these faces:

 

Dalmatian puppies, undated. University Photographs, RS 14/1/N, box 1246.3

Dalmatian puppies, undated. University Photographs, RS 14/1/N, box 1246.3

National Puppy Day was founded in 2006 to not only celebrate the wonderfulness of puppies, but to also encourage responsible adoption and raise awareness of puppy mills. Just remember, “with cute puppies, comes great responsibility.” (I might’ve paraphrased a little).

Want to see more puppy pictures, or pictures of other animals? Ask about University Photographs RS 14/1 (Veterinary Medicine). If you’re more interested in livestock, we have plenty of those photos in University Photographs RS 9/11 (Animal Science). For wildlife, give University Photographs RS 9/10 (Animal Ecology) a try. Hope to see you soon!

Posted by: Chris A. | March 22, 2016

“To avoid the expense of a useless journey …”

Today I have a special challenge for our readers. You may wonder what this blog post’s title has to do with ISU. The quoted phrase comes from an 1872 report from the Board of Trustees to the Governor, and it pertains to examinations given to prospective students:

Highlight

The rejected applicants with no funds to return home probably formed a peculiar underclass, blighting the fair streets of Ames before adopting the ways of the hobo.

I found the sample exam interesting enough to share. Unfortunately, we do not have an answer key. Nevertheless, the boldest minds among you are invited to test their worthiness!

Page 16

Biennial report of the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (1872).

 

Page 17

Regarding question 6, do you suppose the “office” of the participle is its function? Regarding the spelling portion: did you know the word “erysipelas” (a skin disease)?

 

Page 18

If you’re not in deep trouble yet, my hat is off to you. I hope it was possible to get partial points for an answer, as opposed to nothing.

 

Page 19

The last page of the sample exam.

 

I would not score the required 75/100. I might not even be admitted as a remedial student.

What do you think about the exam? As freshmen in 1872 would we have met in the remedial courses? Could you pass the test so as to “avoid the expense of a useless journey” to and from your family’s farm? Did you remember to bring your own straw tick, as instructed? I look forward to your comments!

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