History of the Library, Pt. 2

This is the second in a series of posts about the history of the library at Iowa State.

When we left off in 1914, the library was in Beardshear Hall, and the collection was bursting at the seams.  As early as 1911, money was allocated by the legislature to build a library building.  However, the process was slow-going, especially when it was discovered that in order to build a building of adequate size, much more funding would be needed.

Finally in 1923, construction on the new library building was started, and the first cornerstone was laid on October 11.  Construction was complete in 1925, though not all books were moved until early 1926.  One of the major benefits of the new library was that the materials were consolidated into one space instead of being spread out between Central (Beardshear), Agriculture Hall, Chemistry Building, Engineering Hall, and the Veterinary Building.

SELibrary1925

Southeast view of the library, 1925, University Photograph box 313

The building had space to store 200,000 books.  At the time of opening, the library had “about 160,000 carefully selected volumes” (Catalogue, 1927-1928).

The library hours during regular sessions were:

Monday-Friday 7:50 am-6pm and 7-9:30pm
Saturday: 7:50am-2 and 1-6pm
Sunday: 2-5pm (no procrastinating until Sunday night!)

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South end of Periodical Room, 1927 University Photographs box 146

Periodical_Room_Main_Reading_Room_1925

Periodical Room (Main Reading Room), 1925, University Photographs box 170

In 1925/6, the library offered 4 courses; classes in library usage specifically for agriculture, home economics, and industrial science students, and a course in bibliographic research.    A 5th course in library methods had been added by the next year.  The dean of the library was Charles Harvey Brown. Brown served as dean of the library from 1922-1946.  In 1927, the library had 10 staff members and 12 assistants listed in the catalogue (compared to today’s 143 staff between librarians, support staff, and students).

The Alumnus had a rather interesting take on the new library building in their November 1924 issue:

“Officials say that the library will be ready for occupancy some time in January.  Some time early in the year, six libraries will be consolidated into one, and the amorous youth will no longer wend his away to Central, but to the new white structure beyond it, there to seek out his fair bibliophile and divert her affections to something more substantial than books.” (RS 4/8/4, box 12)

Sounds like the library staff had their hands full!

1925 Library Staff

Library Staff 1925, University Photographs box 2040

From 1925 to the present the library has been in the same location but has grown.  Join us for the next installments to see how the library has expanded in the last (nearly) century!




#TBT: Louis Armstrong at ISU and International Jazz Day 2017

 

Louis Armstrong with ISU mascot Cy in 1966

The incomparable Louis Armstrong with ISU mascot Cy in 1966. (University Photograph Collection, RS 22/7.)

Jazz legend Louis Armstrong visited Iowa State University twice. The 1950 Homecoming festivities included no less than four performances by Armstrong and his band: two dances, the “Pep Barbecue,” and a concert in the Memorial Union! This may seem remarkable because in 1950, Armstrong was an international star. But for decades, Armstrong played 300 or more live shows per year. Touring with a big band was no longer feasible for most bandleaders, but Armstrong — who first made a name for himself in the 1920s with small-group recordings — was not reliant on the big band format. In 1950, Louis Armstrong and His All Stars probably played ISU as a six-piece band featuring Arvell Shaw, bass; Barney Bigard, clarinet; Cozy Cole, drums; Earl “Fatha” Hines, piano; Jack Teagarden, trombone; and of course, Louis Armstrong on trumpet and vocals. Each of these musicians is numbered among the masters of traditional jazz (for lack of a better term).

As shown in the photograph above, Louis Armstrong returned to ISU in 1966, two years after his biggest-selling record (“Hello, Dolly!”) was released. In the late 1960s, Armstrong continued performing publicly in spite of health problems. He passed away in 1971 at his home in Queens, New York City.

International Jazz Day 2017 is April 30, and it’s a special one. This year, the host city is Havana, Cuba. As usual, the roster of artists is drawn from around the world, but this year the lineup includes quite a few Cubans; and, now that the travel ban is lifted, the audience will include Americans! So, this is a big deal on several levels. Cuban musicians are a big part of jazz history and of current practice. I’m looking forward to watching the webcast of the All-Star Global Concert on Sunday, April 30 at 8 PM Central.

 


#TBT Forestry

Forestry Student, 1916

Student with pine cones, presumably at Forestry Camp, 1916 RS 09/14, Box 718

Earth Day is coming this Saturday, and we are celebrating with some pictures from the Department of Forestry camp records.  Forestry is currently part of the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, but was part of the Department of Horticulture and Forestry at the time the photos were taken.

Forestry Summer Camp, 1916

Forestry Summer Camp, Glacier National Park, Montana, 1916 RS 9/14, Box 718

Pictures from the Forestry department are a perfect fit for Earth Day.  According to the Iowa State University Forestry website, “The forestry curriculum offers courses dealing with the management of forest ecosystems for multiple benefits including biodiversity, recreation, water, wilderness, wildlife, and wood and fiber. Conservation and preservation of natural resources are emphasized.”

To learn more about forestry camp, please visit this blog post.  Enjoy these photos from over 100 years ago, and have a Happy Earth Day!


#TBT Iowa’s State Parks: Marking 100 Years

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Carl Fritz Hemmings (left) with Louis Pammel (right) (from University Photograph Collection, box 1026)

Today’s Throw Back Thursday photograph is of Iowa State botany professor Louis Pammel with Ledges State Park custodian Carl Fritz Hemmings. This year marks the centennial of the passage of the first state parks act in Iowa, which was approved April 12, 1917. The Iowa State University Library Special Collections and University Archives  plans a summer exhibition, “This movement for a more beautiful Iowa”: The Early Years of Iowa’s State Park System” which will open to the public on May 17.

Iowa’s landscape of native prairie, forests, and wetlands was rapidly disappearing by the early part of the 20th century due to an expanding population and growing agricultural operations. Individuals from across Iowa advocated for the legislature to set aside land to conserve Iowa’s dwindling natural landscapes resulting in the passage of Iowa’s state parks bill in 1917. Iowa State played a central role in establishing the state park system and the state of Iowa soon became a national leader in the state park movement. The exhibit highlights Iowa State’s role in the state park movement.


#TBT Camel at Vet Med

Veterinary_Medicine_College_1963

University Photographs 14/5/B, Box 1273

Today’s TBT photo was taken in front of the Vet Med clinic in 1963.  As you can see, a camel is being led to the building, perhaps for treatment or an examination.  That is quite the departure from the cats and dogs you usually expect to see at the vet’s office!

To learn more about veterinary medicine at Iowa State University, please see our finding aid or stop by the reading room, open 9-5, Monday-Friday.


#TBT Iowa State team designs, builds, & races solar cars

Team PrISUm competing in the Sunrayce, July 1990. (Team PrISUm (Iowa State University) Records, RS 22/5/0/30, Special Collections Department, Iowa State University Library.)

The Iowa State University solar car team, Team PrISUm, is a student organization that designs, builds, and races solar cars in the American Solar Challenge (previously known as Sunrayce). ISU Special Collections and University Archives has a collection of the team’s records (RS 22/5/0/30).

The car pictured above finished the 1800+ mile race in just over 109 hours; the winning car, by the University of Michigan, made it in under 73 hours.


#TBT Sigma Alpha Epsilon bunny party

Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity members partying in 1978 or 1979. (Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, Iowa Gamma Chapter Records, RS 22/11/2/33, Special Collections Department, Iowa State University Library.)

ISU Special Collections and University Archives has a wealth of information about student organizations over the years. Here is a rare late-70s photo of SAE fraternity members dressed as bunnies and staying out of trouble. The ISU chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon (“Iowa Gamma”) was established in 1905. For more images and documents, see RS 22/11/2/33.