Iowa Museum Week #TBT #IowaMuseumWeek

We are smack in the middle of Iowa Museum Week so today’s #ThrowbackThursday picture is a historical photograph of the Brunnier Art Museum on campus.

Black-and-white photograph of school age children and one adult, white woman with long hair, surrounding a museum exhibit case, filled with a doll collection. Location is the Brunnier Museum on Iowa State University campus. No date.

Visitors viewing the doll collection at the Brunnier Art Museum, no date on photograph (University Photographs, box 433).

Try to make it out to a local museum this week. If you can’t manage a visit, you can celebrate with them on Facebook!

Iowa museum factoids:

  • Iowa’s approximately 400 museums range from arboretums to zoos. While museums are different in many ways, they are all educational collecting organizations, providing careful stewardship for future generations.
  • Iowa museums offer over 60,000 public programs every year, many of them free.
  • By providing learning in an “active” environment, museums offer all ages unique ways to learn, fostering lifelong interests. Active learning environments such as those offered by museums allow for choice and encourage problem solving, critical thinking skills, and creativity.
  • The American Alliance of Museums reports that the nonprofit arts and cultural industry annually generates over $135 billion in economic activity, supporting more than 4.1 million full-time jobs and returning over $22 billion in local, state, and federal tax revenue.

 


Celebrate Pride: “It is OK to be yourself and who you are”

June is LGBTQ Pride Month. Pride month is celebrated in June to honor the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots that took place in New York City in 1969. The Stonewall Riots were a significant development in the fight for equal rights for the LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning or Queer) community. In honor of Pride Month, here is a page from the 1994 Bomb, Iowa State University’s yearbook, that describes the National Coming out Day rally on campus on October 11, 1994.

Caption for photograph of a white male in top right part of page: lgb student services coordinator christopher james speaks about being bisexual at coming out day. photo by mike king. "LGBA: taking the next step" by theresa wilson. While diversity became a dominant issue on campus, the issue of acceptance for lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans gender persons remained hidden. At least it did until one day in October when the LGB community took center stage. The Lesbian/ Gay /Bisexual Alliance held its annual Coming Out Day Oct. II, in conjuntion with National Coming Out Day. Approximately 100 students, faculty and staff attended a rally south of the Campanile to show their support for the LGB community. Speakers encouraged people to "come out" to friends, relatives and acquaintances. The theme of the event was "Taking the Next Step." LGBA Vice President Chuck Bevolo, one of the organizers of Coming Out Day, said the theme had many connotations. "It entails a lot of different things," Bevolo said. "It means something different for each person. Taking the next step can mean coming out of the closet to yourself and to your friends. It can mean telling someone else you care about what you have already told your family and friends so they know what you do. It can mean becoming active. It involves the coming out process, a process of steps that you must take one at a time." People from throughout the campus and the state of Iowa spoke at the rally. Bill Crews, mayor of Melborne, Iowa, encouraged people to be active in supporting the LGB community. Celia Naylor-Ojurongbe, adviser for the Margaret Sloss Women's Center, read a poem written for the rally. Speakers discussed the different aspects of being a lebian, gay, bisexual or trans gender person. LGBA also presented a Tuesday Topic session at the Margaret Sloss Women's Center and held a social dinner at Pizza Kitchens. Jeanine Bessette, LGBS adviser, attended the rally and said she found comfort in being surrounded by people who supported her lifestyle. "The Coming Out Day rally is a day of celebration in my life and a day that says it is OK to be who you are. It gives the opportunity to come out to people and let people know. It gives the LGB community a chance to celebrate who they are." "I really enjoyed the speakers from all different walks of life. They talked about their personal experiences. Allies talked about their support and working for our rights. I just liked the atmosphere." Bevolo said one message dominated the rally. "The predominant message was that it is OK to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and it is OK to be yourself and who you are. Doing that means being honest with yourself, your friends and your family. It is not always easy and it is not always pleasant, but it must be done, and people are willing to help."

 

At the end of the page, Chuck Bevolo, the LGBA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Alliance) Vice President said:

The predominant message was that it is OK to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and it is OK to be yourself and who you are.

Below are some current Iowa State University LGBTQIAA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, Asexual, Ally)  student organizations and resources:

The Iowa State University LGBTQA+ Faculty & Staff Association was created for faculty & staff who are supportive of the LGBTQ+ community.

For more information on the history of LGBTQ+ student organizations at Iowa State, check out a prior blog post “LGBT Month” written in 2015. Or drop by our reading room to conduct more research. We’re open Monday-Friday from 9-5.


#TBT Dairy Month

Tomorrow kicks off Dairy Month, and today’s #Throwback Thursday post includes links to posts of Dairy Months past.

Iowa State Dairy circa 1905 (University Photographs, box 639).

Here are some prior posts we’ve done to celebrate Dairy Month:

Fun Facts

  • A cow is more valuable for its milk, cheese, butter, and yogurt than for its beef.
  • All 50 states have dairy farms.
  • Dairy is the 5th largest agricultural business in Iowa.
  • 99% of the ~1,400 dairy farms in Iowa are family-owned.
  • Dairy Month started out as National Milk Month in 1937, to promote drinking milk of course.
Black-and-white photo of a man (presumably a student) sitting on a stool, wearing overalls, work shirt, and cap milking a cow a red and white spotted cows. The pair are flanked by cows on either side.

Undated photograph (University Photographs RS 9/13 Food Technology).

Check out how ISU Extension and Outreach are celebrating Dairy Month.

References for Fun Facts:

“Celebrate Dairy Month in June”  by Iowa State University Extension & Outreach 

Dairy Month media kit by the International Dairy Foods Association


Congratulations Petrina Jackson!

SCUA Department Head, Petrina Jackson, has been elected to Society of American Archivists Council! She will serve a 3-year term, 2018-2021. Join us in congratulating her!


In Honor of Women’s History Month: Winifred R. Tilden

Ames, Iowa native Winifred R. Tilden was a long-time and influential faculty member at Iowa State College (University). In honor of Women’s History Month and in commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the United States’ involvement in World War I, we highlight her and her contribution to the war effort.

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Photograph of Winifred Tilden in her YWCA uniform, ca. 1918. Original located in the Farwell T. Brown Photographic Archive, Ames Public Library. Winifred R. Tilden papers, RS 10/7/11

Faculty members answered the call to duty not only by serving as officers, but also in noncombat capacities. Winifred R. Tilden was one of them. Tilden spent her career at Iowa State College as a leader of physical education for women. She initially served as Director of Physical Culture for Women and was later named Professor of Physical Education. During World War I, Tilden took leave so that she could direct a National Y.W.C.A-sponsored recreational program in a French nurses camp. Formally, she served as Hostess and Recreation Director at Toul and then as Manager of the Palais Royal in Paris.

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Receipt of Identity Card Application, Paris, France November 5, 1918. Winifred R. Tilden papers, RS 10/7/11
This was the form that Winifred Tilden used to apply for a foreign identity card during her service in France.

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How the Blue Triangle helps in France. Y.W.C.A.: Homes–For American War Workers: Recreation–For American Nurses: Rest Rooms–For French Munition Workers. American War Posters from the First World War, UC Berkeley. 1917-1918. Courtesy of Bancroft Library, University of California. From the American War Posters from the First World War, BANC PIC 2005.001:128–AX. 

To learn more about Winifred R. Tilden, come to Special Collections and University Archives, located on the 4th floor of Parks Library and see her collection in person. Find the guide to her collection here.

For more about Iowa’s involvement in World War I, visit our exhibition “Do[ing] Their Bit:” Iowa’s Role in the Great War on display on the 4th floor of Parks Library.


NHPRC Update: New Discoveries

Khrushchev waving

Khrushchev waving to onlookers on campus. [University Photograph Collection, RS 00, Dignitaries and Other Notable Visitors, Boxes 11-15]

The New Year has begun, and the NHPRC grant project to ingest all of the Special Collections and University Archives finding aids continues to move forward. At the end of last year, we hit the milestone of getting every Manuscript Collection with a finding aid entered into our CuadraStar SKCA archival catalog database – nearly 600 finding aids in all. We have now moved on to the University Archives finding aids, and have raised the total to 800. It is exciting to see this number climb every day.

As a result, I have gotten the chance to read many of the finding aids as they go into the database. This has taught me quite a bit about SCUA’s collections, both in terms of how they relate to my own interests and about things that I previously knew nothing about.

I was a Russian major as an undergraduate, and so was interested to come across materials that document Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev’s Iowa visit in 1959. As part of his visit, Khrushchev toured the Coon Rapids, Iowa farm of Roswell Garst, as well as the Swine Nutrition Research Center on the Iowa State campus.

Garst had previously hosted a Soviet delegation on his farm as part of an agricultural exchange in 1955. The visitors had come to the United States to learn about agricultural technology that would be applied in the Soviet Virgin Lands Campaign to increase agricultural output in the Soviet Union. Garst later traveled to the USSR himself as part of a return delegation, and it was on this trip that he met Khrushchev and personally invited him to visit Iowa.

Typescript of Khrushchev's speech in Des Moines, Sept. 22, 1959

Typescript of a speech given by Khrushchev at a dinner in his honor, held at Hotel Fort Des Moines, Des Moines, Iowa, September 22, 1959. [Garst Family papers, MS 579, box 43, folder 52]

Materials related to Khrushchev’s visit to Iowa can be found in the papers of Roswell Garst (RS 21/7/12), John Chrystal (MS 422), President James H. Hilton (RS 2/10), Damon Von Catron (RS 9/11/55) and the Garst Family (MS 579). The fiftieth anniversary of Chairman Khrushchev’s visit was marked by a 2009 celebration in Des Moines and Coon Rapids, information about which can be found in the Khrushchev Committee 50th Anniversary Event records (MS 615).  Further materials related to agricultural relations between Iowa and the Soviet Union can be found in the Garst Company records (MS 642), the Garst and Thomas Hybrid Corn Company records (MS 173), and the Charles J. Hearst papers (MS 3).

As someone new to the University, and to Iowa in general, this I have enjoyed learning more about local history. I am looking forward to learning more about the SCUA collections as this project continues, as well as to what researchers find once we launch the new archival catalog at the end of this year.

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This project has been generously funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).


A Welcome to Rachael Acheson, Our Assistant University Archivist

Rachael Acheson began work as the Assistant University Archivist in SCUA on January 8, 2018. Her work will center around documentation of student life at ISU, including the collection of current and historical records from student organizations and  archiving University and student-run websites and social media pages with Archive-It. She will also assist with more general processing, outreach, and instruction.

In August 2016, Rachael earned her dual master’s degree in English (MA) and Library and Information Science (MLIS) from the University of South Carolina, where she concentrated on Archives and Special Collections, which allowed her to indulge both her fascination with rare books and textual studies along with discursive interests in transatlantic literature. While in her graduate program, Rachael taught freshman English courses and interned with the oral history and rare books departments. Rachael also had the opportunity to complete a number of amazing internships with the university libraries and local archives, including one that involved preparations to host a travelling exhibit from the Folger Shakespeare Library, which featured a First Folio.

Immediately before coming to ISU, Rachael worked in Cedar Falls, IA, where she completed a 10-month temporary assignment as the Special Collections and University Archives Librarian at University of Northern Iowa.

Here are a few fun facts about Rachael:

    1. She is currently very much out-of-practice, but she plays the harp and began college as a Harp Performance major. Mary Foss, the principal harpist of the Des Moines Symphony Orchestra and also Adjunct Professor at ISU, Drake University, and Central College, was the first of her many excellent harp teachers. As a result, Rachael had the opportunity to attend an ISU masterclass with Catrin Finch, formerly the Royal Harpist to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, when Rachael had been playing for only five months. After serving as the principle harpist for her college orchestra for four years, Rachael also performed briefly with the Central Iowa Symphony.
    2. She has a pewter-gray cat named Sterling, who enjoys standing on her head in the early hours of the morning and watching tv.
    3. She is a huge nerd about children’s and Young Adult (YA) literature, collects illustrated editions of Frances Hodgson Burnett novels, and has met Maggie Stiefvater twice.
    4. She spent a large portion of her childhood in Iowa Falls, Iowa, and so has some history of her own with Ames and likes to think she is in the process of getting better acquainted with the state as a whole.

Rachael’s literary cat, Sterling, posing for the camera.

She is excited to be back in the area. We’re excited too!


“Do[ing] Their Bit”: Iowa’s Role in the Great War opening Wednesday, January 17!

This week and next we’re installing our next exhibition, “Do[ing] Their Bit”: Iowa’s Role in the Great War, which opens Wednesday, January 17. This exhibition commemorates the 100th Anniversary of the United States involvement in World War I. The exhibition will remain open through the spring semester.

Lorraine and the rest of the Printing Services team installing our window display (Photograph by Rachel Seale).

The opening reception is Wednesday, January 17, from 6:30 to 8 p.m in 198 Parks Library. Guest speakers, Jack Lufkin and Mark Heggen will show and discuss, Deeds Not Words, their historic video about the World War I Black Officers Training Camp at Fort Des Moines. Jack Lufkin is the curator at the Fort Des Moines Museum and Education Center.  Mark Heggen is an independent filmmaker and ISU alumnus.

"Do[ing] Their Bit": Iowa's Role in the Great War. Opening reception, January 17, 2018, 6:30 p.m.in 198 Parks Library. Refreshments courtesy of Iowa State University Diversity and Inclusion

Contact Rachel Seale for questions about the exhibition or the reception.


A Welcome to Rosalie Gartner, Our Lead Processing Archivist

Rosalie Gartner on vacation last summer in Scotland (courtesy of Rosalie Gartner).

Rosalie Gartner joined the SCUA team on November 15, 2017 as the Lead Processing Archivist. She moved here from Boston, Massachusetts, where she has lived for the past 6 years. Originally from Colorado, she moved to Boston to attend Simmons College, where she earned her MS in Library Science with a concentration in Archives Management. After graduation, she worked at Emerson College for several years, doing everything from course instruction to processing to records management.  In her free time, she enjoys reading (of course), sewing, and traveling. Despite the extreme cold, Rosalie is happy to be here! And we are super ecstatic to have her here!!


Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act #PubMedia50 @amarchivepub: Audiovisual Preservation

Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) have joined the American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s month-long celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary by posting content throughout the month of November to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! This is our fifth and last post commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 and this week I’m highlighting some recent actions we’ve taken to preserving our audiovisual collections, which includes our collections related to public broadcasting.

For our current initiatives, we’ve been focused on audiovisual preservation. Last spring, we hired Rosie Rowe, our Audiovisual Preservation Specialist. This is a new position, charged with providing guidance on our audiovisual preservation and access workflow.

AV digitization workstation 1

Video Preservation Rack (Courtesy of Brad Kuennen).

AV digitization workstation 2

Audio Preservation Rack (in process) (Courtesy of Brad Kuennen).

Through the acquisition of equipment from other campus units and purchasing other needed tools, Rosie has constructed a Video Preservation Rack. She has developed a digitization workflow and is currently training students to assist with some of that work. She is in the process of constructing an audio preservation workstation. Through her initiative and in collaboration with other department staff, she has developed an audiovisual access policy based on principles of best practices for preservation, identified priority collections for digitization, and improved intellectual control over collections. This work will greatly benefit our audiovisual collections so that they can be better preserved, managed, and shared.

This post was co-written by Rachel Seale, outreach archivist, & Brad Kuennen, university archivist.