Color the cookbook!

Here is our last coloring page for the day. It’s from Mrs. Welch’s Cook Book.

You can browse our Cookbook Collection online:


Click here to download & print this page.

Tag your work #ColorOurCollections #ISU_Archives

This week-long foray into the coloring craze was initiated by the New York Academy of Medicine Library. We are participating in this week-long special collections coloring fest to promote our collections anad engage followers.

Check out the 70+ other repositories joining in on the fun!

Color the Bomb!

Here is our second coloring page of the day. It’s from the Bomb, The Iowa Agricultural College/Iowa State University yearbook. The Bomb was published annually for the graduating classes of 1894 through 1994, with the exception of 1902.

Stop by our reading room and browse all volumes, we’re open Monday-Friday from 10 -4. You can also click here to browse selected volumes online.

Title page from the 1895 The Bomb

Click here to download & print the coloring page.

Don’t forget to share your work! Tag #ColorOurCollections #ISU_Archives


Coffee & color!

Color this page while you have your morning cup of coffee! What better way to start your day in a nice relaxing way!

This is another image reproduced from the Warren H. Manning Papers. You can browse other digitized images from that collection here:


Map showing infestation of gypsy moth ca. 1891.

Click here to download the page. Don’t forget to tag your work! #ColorOurCollections #ISU_Archives

Cypix: Wintertime fun

Here is another glass plate negative from the Descartes Pascal Papers demonstrating some wintertime fun.


Boys on horse-drawn sleds in winter. Lee Pascal and Jasper Babcock are on the front sled. Percy Pascal and Jim Townsen are on the rear sled. The horse’s name is Daisy. The photo is taken in front of the corn crib on the Pascal farm. MS 091 Box 9, folder 5.

Descartes Pascal (1870-1937) was a photographer, farmer, and pioneer seed corn breeder.  Pascal was born in De Witt, Clinton County, Iowa, where he raised corn, Shorthorn cattle, and Berkshire hogs. Pascal was also a practicing photographer.

You can find more information on the Descartes Pascal Papers in this finding aid that describes the collection and view more of his collection in our ISU Library Digital Collections, the online exhibit, and on our Flickr site.

You can also view the collection in person! We’re here from 10-4 Monday – Friday.

CyPix: Winter dresses of 1920

"Winter Dresses." A selection from the Mary A. Barton Collection of Fashion Illustrations (RS 21/07/009)

“Winter Dresses” from The Designer, January 1920. Part of the Mary A. Barton Collection of Fashion Illustrations (RS 21/07/009)

When I woke up this morning, the news stations were reporting that with the windchill, it was 9 °F outside. I don’t know about you, but the stylish winter fashions above don’t look nearly warm enough!

The image above, and others like it, are available online in the Fashion Plates digital collection.

Check out the following to see some of the other fashion-related collections held at the Iowa State University Special Collections and University Archives Department:

Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Iowa State

RS 7/5/1, box 1, folder 9

Program for “Beyond the Dream,” Martin Luther King, Jr. National Holiday Celebration at Iowa State University, 1989. (RS 7/5/1, box 1, folder 9)

Special Collections is closed today as the University participates in the national recognition of the life and contributions of Dr. Martin Luther King. The holiday, celebrated the third Monday in January, is officially called “Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.” as the original proposal was to have the celebration on Dr. King’s January 15th birthday.

Signed into law in 1983, the federal holiday was first celebrated in 1986. The State of Iowa joined 43 others in celebrating the holiday in 1989. At Iowa State University, the celebration is planned and managed by the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Committee. Special Collections has records of the committee in our web archives here and here.

Iowa State University was lucky enough to be one of the universities Dr. King visited in the 1960s.  He spoke on campus January 22, 1960. His speech, “The Moral Challenges of a New Age” was excerpted in the program for the ISU celebration of 2008:

All I am saying is simply this: All life is interrelated, whatever affects one individual, whatever affects one nation directly affects other individuals and other nations indirectly. We are all tied in a single garment of destiny, we are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, and therefore, we must live together. So long as there is poverty in the world no individual can truly be rich, even if he has a billion dollars. So long as diseases are rampant and millions of people cannot expect to live more than 28 or 30 years, no man can be totally healthy, even if he has just got a checkup from the Mayo Clinic. Strangely enough, I can never be what I ought until you are what you ought to be. This is the way life is made, this is the way the universe is made.”

The full text of this speech is available in RS 22/08/00/01, box 2, folder 1.


Perry Holden in the Field

As the corn crops continue to grow here in Iowa, we decided it would be a good time to do a little “detasseling” of the new digital Extension collection and offer you a teaser! The photo below is one of the most popular and often requested images in the collection. It features Perry G. Holden and a companion perusing a young corn crop.


Holden was a leading name in agricultural education during the early 1900s. He established the Corn Train, and played a major role in the first short courses as an educator and administrator. His work with corn ultimately improved Iowa’s corn crops dramatically, and have greatly influenced how the crops are tended today. For more information on the Extension Service and P. G. Holden, visit the collections page and the Reflections on ISU Extension collection.


Reflections on ISU Extension – New Collection!

It’s my last day as the Silos & Smokestacks intern in the ISU Special Collections! The collection has really come together. Everything is being finalized and all of the pieces I have been working and collaborating on in the past ten weeks are coming together to form a cohesive concept.

This new collection is currently comprised of 57 items. There are several reports, letters, addresses, and photographs, as well as a video. Everything is arranged by subject, but there is also a document guide that can assist in navigating the collection for those that would like a condensed experience. It features 18 highlights that outline the fundamental aspects of the early Extension Service and its impact on Iowa. One of my favorite parts is the timeline. It is in the shape of an ear of corn, and the important dates and events are presented as kernels on the ear. Hovering over each dated kernel will reveal a pop-up box of information about each date.

There are also a few items within the collection that stand out for me. The first is an advertisement from the Boys’ Working Reserve. It would have circulated during the First World War, and was aimed primarily at those who were too young to join the armed forces, but old enough to travel to work. The advertisement is still in very good condition given its age, and the historical context is really quite interesting as it pertains to both World War I and the Extension Service.

Another favorite of mine is the Diary of the Seed Corn Train. It serves as a practical record for the Corn Train – where it stopped and who lectured – but it also introduces an element of humor into the collection. Many of the entries include remarks on the crowds or notable events that stuck out to the instructors as they traveled. In reading through the entries, one gets a keen sense of the personalities of the instructors and how they interacted with each other. As these people and events are referred to in other documents, those remarks introduce that much more dimension to the overall experience.

I think this will be a great addition to the digital collections already available, and there is plenty of potential for it to be expanded in the future. Until then, have fun investigating the Digital Collections home page and the Reflections on ISU Extension collection!

An Update from the Silos & Smokestacks Intern

The Silos & Smokestacks Extension project is progressing well – it’s really starting to take shape now. Most of the final selections have been made for the collection, and the materials were recently digitized and formatted for the digital exhibit. I even got to do the preservation treatments, which was even more fun than I’d hoped it would be. Digging through boxes and finding the highlights has been an engaging process, but I’m also excited to see it start to come together as a tangible item.

The collection will be composed of various reports, photographs, personal reflections, and a large handful of rather unique items. I wanted to be able to capture the early Extension work from several perspectives – the farmers’ and administration specifically. One of my favorites is a set of notes, handwritten by Ralph K. Bliss for several of the short courses he led. His specialties included the care of livestock (swine, cattle, sheep, and horses), as well as the proper judgment of these animals when presented in show. Farmers in these short courses would have looked to this content and instruction for guidance, whether they had a desire to learn which grains were best to feed the horses or the characteristics that determined the best animal in a group.

The notes outline the courses as Bliss would have taught them, but they also provide insight to the time period and the work that was being done by the College. Information that is now common knowledge (or at least easily Googled) would not have been at the time. The notes not only show a stage in the evolution of agricultural progress, but they also serve as a reminder that the wide dispersal of information used to be even more of a luxury than it is now.

I hope this snippet of insight has generated some excitement! Another update will be coming soon.

Hillary H.