#Flashback Friday – Cycles vs. Spartans @CycloneATH @isualum

Tomorrow the Cyclones play the Spartans for the 4th time.

The first game between the two teams was in 1958 and the last game was in 1980. Check out the series information from our 2008 ISU Football Media Guide.

Series record for San Jose State from 2008 ISU Football Media Guide: 3 games, Series record 3-0-0, at Jack Trice Stadium ISU leads 1-0-0; at San Jose State ISU leads 1-0-0, 1958 away game ISU won 9-6, 1959 home game ISU won 55-0, and 1980 home game, ISU won 27-6.

Series record for San Jose State from 2008 ISU Football Media Guide (RS 24/6/0/6 box 5, folder 6)

 

Here’s an article about the 1959 game from the 1959 Bomb:

Cropped page from the 1959 Bomb, ISU Yearbook, describes ISU & San Jose State game. ISU won 9 to 6. "Coach Clay Stapletons players wrote the final chapter to their season by taking control in the second half, coming from behind and defeating the San Jose Spartans, 9-6. Bob Harden, playing the last game of his collegiate career, led the attack by totaling 70 yards in an early third quarter drive. Cliff Ricks conversion gave the Cyclones a one-point lead. The Iowa State fury exploded before the California crowd of 11,000; and a Spartan fumble in Iowa States end zone, recovered by the Cyclone score. Moe Nichols and Bob Harden accounted for 145 and 118 yards respectively, which the Cyclones gained on the ground while reducing the passing average per game for the Spartans from 183 to yr yards. Photogrpah caption: "And Going in for the Cycylones ... But wait! A new rule, enforcing a two-substitutions-per-quarter-per-man rule, required players to sign in with officials before entering the game."

Cropped page 382 from the 1959 Bomb, ISU Yearbook, summarizing the Iowa State San Jose State game.

 

Drop by the SCUA Reading Room to dig up more football facts & trivia. We’re open Monday-Friday, from 9-5.

Go Cyclones!


Go Cyclones! #TBT @CycloneATH

Since this Saturday is the ISU football game against University of Iowa,  this week’s #TBT picture is a photograph of the ISU varsity football team 100 years ago.  Go Cyclones!

Iowa State varsity football team. In the background are State Gym, Marston Water Tower, and engineering buildings, 1916, taken by D.A. Davis.

Iowa State varsity football team. In the background are State Gym, Marston Water Tower, and engineering buildings, 1916, taken by D.A. Davis (University Photographs RS 24-6)

 

For more football pictures from Special Collections & University Archives, check out our Football album on Flickr and our YouTube playlist of ISU Athletics films.

You can also drop by our reading room. We’re on the 4th floor of the Parks Library and open from 9-5, Monday-Friday.


ISU Archivists visit the State Historical Society of Iowa @IowaMuseum #iowahistory

Yesterday we visited the State Historical Society of Iowa in Des Moines. We were able to visit with a number of librarians, archivists, and curators. We learned about the Iowa Newspaper Project and work being done collecting county records, among many other things. This blog post does not do justice to all of the wonderful things we saw and learned about, so you will just have to drop by and visit the collections yourself!

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Introducing the Digital Initiatives Website! @ISU_library

Hooray! The Digital Initiatives unit now has a website explaining what they do and providing a gateway to selected digitized collections. In a nutshell, Digital Initiatives puts collections from Special Collections & University Archives (SCUA) online, as well as selected material from the library’s collection that’s in the public domain.

You can browse by topics, from A-Z, and by material/media type!

Some SCUA collections available are the Bomb (ISU yearbook) and the Cookbook Collection, includes Mrs. Welch’s Cook Book, Kitchen Klatter, and the 1890 Women’s Suffrage Cook Book.

If you want to suggest a new project for Digital Initiatives or ask them a question, contact them on their  Get Involved page.

 

 


Summer Fashions @ISUExtension @tcmuseum_isu

Happy summer solstice! Today’s post will highlight different collections available online that show off some historical summer fashions.

Here are some summery fashion plates from the Fashion Plates Digital Collection. This collection contains plates of general fashion dating back to the 18th century. This digital collection stems from the Mary Barton Fashion Illustration Collection located in Special Collections and University Archives. Mary Barton (1917-2003), an alumna (Class of 1942) from Ames, was a quilt historian who had gained a national reputation for being able to judge a quilt’s age and origin by careful examination.

 

Summer Walking Dress, showing influences from the eastern Mediterranean; underskirt covered by a lace lined overjacket and lace-lined turban with parasol (published by John Bell) from the Mary Barton Fashion Illustration Collection.

Summer Walking Dress, 1809

Morning Promenade Dress and Summer Walking Costume, illustrating elaborate ruffled collars and leg-of-mutton sleeves with widening shoulders overall, a highly decorated bodice with lace cutouts, the waist emphasized by ribbons tied in bows or belt, geometric decoration towards the hem (also tightly fitted), wrists, gloves, parasol, and hats decorated with plaid ribbons, feathers, and lace

Morning Promenade Dress and Summer Walking Costume, 1828

The New Spring and Summer Cloaks and Mantles, demonstrating 5 varieties of loose capes and tent-shaped mantles or paletots that all provided modest warmth and coverage for the large hoop skirts. They have various trims including lace, tassels, braid, and rickrack. Four of the five have sleeves that are fairly loose, and the headwear is a bit more elaborate. The dresses illustrate the changing shape of the skirts shifting more toward the back

New Spring and Summer Cloaks and Mantles, 1864

The videos are from the Special Collections and University Archives YouTube channel. They don’t solely deal with summer fashions but do include dresses I think are pretty summery.  These videos were part of the series “Couture Close-Ups with Charles Kleibacker” produced by the Iowa State University Extension Service. In the series, New York fashion designer Charles Kleibacker demonstrates how he designs women’s clothing using various fabrics and construction techniques.

 

 

 

Check out other fun online collections from the University Library Digital Collections and the Special Collections and University Archives YouTube channel.

Or drop by the reading room to look at our collections in person. We’re open Monday-Friday from 10-4.

If you are interested in researching clothing and textiles, you should check out the ISU Textiles and Clothing Museum.


ISU yearbook digitization completed: The Bomb is online!

The University Library Digital Initiatives unit has completed a major digitization project that’s guaranteed to please a great many people. It’s The Bomb – figuratively and literally! Those of us who work in Special Collections & University Archives are always happy when people make use of the set of yearbooks in our reading room; now researchers around the world will enjoy access to them online, including OCR (Optical Character Recognition) functionality.*

Digital Initiatives Archivist Kim Anderson will send out a press release soon, but here’s an early “heads up” for SCUA blog readers. Special thanks goes to Bill Yungclas, who was primarily responsible for the execution of this six-year project, along with the Digital Initiatives students who worked with him over the years. It was no mean feat, since it involved 109 hefty volumes (1894—1994, the last year of publication).

Bomb 1894

Attractive lettering on the cover, 1894. IAC stands for Iowa Agricultural College.

As you can imagine, The Bomb varied quite a bit during its century of existence. In 1971 it consisted of six separate books and a supplementary 33⅓ RPM phonograph record! You can view and even download The Bomb here, including a digitized version of the recording.

Bomb record

The record is actually round, and has another side. I haven’t listened to it.

*Note that the text generated automatically by Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software can look odd and contain errors. When in doubt, read the scanned pages yourself. Some of the yearbooks feature indexes, but most do not. Thankfully, OCR text allows you to search for words or phrases; however, it’s not perfect, particularly when there are special fonts or unusual layouts.


Educating Farmers on Educational Trains

Amy Bishop, rare books and manuscript curator, at our exhibit table in the Iowa State Capitol's rotunda for Silos & Smokestacks Legislative Showcase.

Amy Bishop, rare books and manuscript curator, at our exhibit table in the Iowa State Capitol’s rotunda for Silos & Smokestacks Legislative Showcase.

Yesterday my colleague Amy Bishop & I attended the Silos & Smokestacks Annual Partner Site Meeting & Legislative Showcase in Des Moines. There are 115 partner sites that constitute Silos & Smokestacks National Heritage Area (SSNHA) and all of the partner sites preserve and tell the story of American agriculture in some way. National Heritage Areas are places designated by Congress where natural, cultural, and historic resources combine to tell a story that celebrates our nation’s diverse heritage. Special Collections & University Archives are a partner site for SSNHA.

We attended educational sessions in the morning and in the afternoon we put on a tabletop exhibit about a website created during a summer internship, Reflections on ISU Extension, that was funded by an SSNHA grant in 2014. The intern developed a digital collection and contributed to the design of its accompanying website. The collection offers a look into the early work of the Extension Service, its role in the education of farmers, and the impact it had on agricultural advancement and production. It is composed of documents, photographs, and select media.

One of the neatest things I learned from browsing through this digital collection was about the educational trains. The university (known then as Iowa Agricultural College and Model Farm) sent instructors on trains throughout the state to teach classes on seed corn and other agriculture related topics of interest to Iowa’s farmers such as crops, livestock, and home economics.

 

Educational Trains. 1905. J. W. Jones speaking. M. L. Mosher helping. Audience in coach listens to a talk on producing better corn. Note the Holden sawdust corn testing box, a method by which 6 kernels of corn from each seed ear could be tested. Audience advised to plant only ears that tested six kernels strong.

Educational Trains. 1905. J. W. Jones speaking. M. L. Mosher helping. Audience in coach listens to a talk on producing better corn. Note the Holden sawdust corn testing box, a method by which 6 kernels of corn from each seed ear could be tested. Audience advised to plant only ears that tested six kernels strong.

 

On the Hog train. Snyder speaking soils man, ca. 1910s.

On the Hog train. Snyder speaking soils man, ca. 1910s.

 

Read more about the history of ISU Extension here: http://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/documents/ISUExt_History.pdf or view the Reflections on ISU Extension digital collection. You can always stop by and see original documents and photographs documenting the work of Extension or other collections related to agriculture. We’re open Monday-Friday 10-4.


Cypix: Flood flashback #TBT

The Ames & College Railway, better known as the Dinkey, provided transportation between the City of Ames, Iowa and the Iowa Agricultural College (Iowa State University). As a joint venture of Ames and the College, the Dinkey began operating on July 4, 1891. The Ames & College Railway was sold to the Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern Railroad in 1907. That year the Dinkey was replaced with an electric streetcar, known as the interurban.

The photograph below shows the Dinkey tracks during a flood occurring in Spring ca. 1901, water in Squaw Creek overflowed the banks and submerged the surrounding area. The water is high, but doesn’t appear to be over the tracks.

During a flood occuring in Spring 1901 or 1902, water in Squaw Creek over-flowed the banks, submerging the surrounding area. The water is high, but doesn't appear to be over the Ames & college Railway (The Dinkey) tracks. Two individuals are observing the creek and flood. The Marston Water Tower, Carrie Chapman Catt Hall (Botany Hall) and Old Main (after the 1st fire) are in the distance. (University Photographs)

Two individuals are observing the creek and flood. The Marston Water Tower, Carrie Chapman Catt Hall (Botany Hall) and Old Main (after the 1st fire) are in the distance. (University Photographs).

 

This photograph was found in the University Library Digital Collections. Browse around online to see what we have or drop by in person and visit us in the reading room! We’re open from 10:00 – 4:00 Monday – Friday.


100 Years of Cyclone Wrestling

100YearsOfWrestling

Last week marked the 100th anniversary of wrestling at ISU.  In celebration, the library presents “100 years of Cyclone wrestling” – a digital collection of images from the wrestling program’s past.

More images and other historic wrestling materials can be found in the following collections located in the Special Collections and University Archives Department (room 403, Parks Library):


Color the cookbook!

Here is our last coloring page for the day. It’s from Mrs. Welch’s Cook Book.

You can browse our Cookbook Collection online: http://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/cookbook-collection

coloringpage03.2.1.2016

Click here to download & print this page.

Tag your work #ColorOurCollections #ISU_Archives

This week-long foray into the coloring craze was initiated by the New York Academy of Medicine Library. We are participating in this week-long special collections coloring fest to promote our collections anad engage followers.

Check out the 70+ other repositories joining in on the fun!