SCUA 104

Thanks for coming back to the blog!  This is the 4th post in a series about using the Special Collections and University Archives at ISU.

Today I’m going to talk about your options if you need reproductions of our materials.  While we highly encourage researchers to visit us to see our collection, we understand that sometimes that is just not possible due to distance or other factors. Don’t fear—there are still some options for those who can’t come to the archives in person.

We can make photocopies through our document delivery program.  These are low-resolution photocopies we make on our overhead scanner.  Depending on the size of the order, we can have these copies sent to you via email or through the “snail” mail in about 2-4 weeks, though it can take longer for large or complicated orders.

Bookeye

Our Bookeye overhead scanner. The black pads fold up to create a book cradle!

We are also able to make publication quality high-resolution scans of our images.  Depending on your use, you may also need to fill out a request to publish form when you order your images.  There are fees for both document delivery and image reproduction; please consult our website or send us an email to learn more!

Of course, we must comply with copyright law when making scans and reproductions.  Unfortunately, this sometimes blocks us from being able to make reproductions of things that we do not have rights to, are not in the public domain, or whole volumes.  While copyright law is extremely complicated, a good place to start learning about what is and is not allowed is the library’s page on copyright issues.

Have any questions about any of these services? Feel free to email us at archives@iastate.edu. Want to know more about SCUA?  See our previous posts in this series about our reading room rules, what happens when you visit the reading room, or finding student records in the archives.

3Cys

Our Cy and baby Cys would love to see you, but we understand that sometimes that’s just not possible. Photo credit Olivia Garrison, taken 6/19/18


HBCU Connections at Iowa State University

By Shaina Destine, Residency Librarian

Archives, all across the United States, have historically been venues that excluded the voices of marginalized communities.  That is problematic for many reasons but most importantly future generations will not have a full picture of history as it happened.  When multiple segments of a story are discarded, the story is far from reality and can be distorted in any way that suits the desired narrative.  That is a powerful and dangerous weapon.  My calling as an archivist is to fill in those gaps. More than accuracy, archives are a stamp that someone was here.  Archives are a stamp that someone did something. It is a tool of empowerment.  Representation is a necessity for communities that have been silenced for generations.

The HBCU Connections at ISU, a wiki featuring black ISU alumni who learned and worked at historically black colleges and universities (HBCU), was a labor of love and of duty.  It was my responsibility.  Black students have been here at Iowa State.  They have accomplished things that people at the time – and people now – could not even imagine.  However, there was very little evidence of them in our archive, so I began to research.  In the early part of the 20th century, black people were suffering, living and dying under Jim Crow laws but still had this resilient spirit and desire to give back to their communities through education.  HBCUs were in their infancy, but were essential in this endeavor.  Through my research, I found that many black people, who passed through Iowa State for undergraduate or graduate degrees, went on to – or in some cases, back to – HBCUs to build the school and, in essence, the black community.

This project covers any black Iowa State alumni from 1900 to 1950 who went on to serve at an HBCU in any capacity.  It features professors to presidents. It is meant to be a living platform that can be updated as additional information becomes available and uncovered.  *If you have any updated information to add to this project, please email it with sources to archives@iastate.edu.

HBCU Atwood

Screenshot of “Rufus B. Atwood,” HBCU Connections. Iowa State University. hbcuconnections.iastatedigital.org/Rufus_B._Atwood

This project is also meant to bridge the gap between the Iowa State University archives and the archives at the various HBCUs with whom I communicated.  HBCU archives are traditionally under-funded and under-resourced.  My hope is that this bridge is helpful to them in some way.  Lastly, my hope is that this project is helpful to future scholars who need to see the stamp of their ancestors and follow the breadcrumbs that they left us on how to help raise up the community.

I am extremely proud of this project.  I am glad that the Special Collections and University Archives at Iowa State University Library gave me the opportunity to create it.  I am glad that there is more research and platforms like this on its way (stay tuned!). I’m so happy that I had a mentor like Harrison Inefuku, scholarly publishing services librarian, to teach me so much in the process.  And lastly, I’m glad that I have created my stamp on the archives and brought these stories to the fore.  Please enjoy: hbcuconnections.iastatedigital.org

 


Iowa Museum Week #TBT #IowaMuseumWeek

We are smack in the middle of Iowa Museum Week so today’s #ThrowbackThursday picture is a historical photograph of the Brunnier Art Museum on campus.

Black-and-white photograph of school age children and one adult, white woman with long hair, surrounding a museum exhibit case, filled with a doll collection. Location is the Brunnier Museum on Iowa State University campus. No date.

Visitors viewing the doll collection at the Brunnier Art Museum, no date on photograph (University Photographs, box 433).

Try to make it out to a local museum this week. If you can’t manage a visit, you can celebrate with them on Facebook!

Iowa museum factoids:

  • Iowa’s approximately 400 museums range from arboretums to zoos. While museums are different in many ways, they are all educational collecting organizations, providing careful stewardship for future generations.
  • Iowa museums offer over 60,000 public programs every year, many of them free.
  • By providing learning in an “active” environment, museums offer all ages unique ways to learn, fostering lifelong interests. Active learning environments such as those offered by museums allow for choice and encourage problem solving, critical thinking skills, and creativity.
  • The American Alliance of Museums reports that the nonprofit arts and cultural industry annually generates over $135 billion in economic activity, supporting more than 4.1 million full-time jobs and returning over $22 billion in local, state, and federal tax revenue.

 


Celebrate Pride: “It is OK to be yourself and who you are”

June is LGBTQ Pride Month. Pride month is celebrated in June to honor the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots that took place in New York City in 1969. The Stonewall Riots were a significant development in the fight for equal rights for the LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning or Queer) community. In honor of Pride Month, here is a page from the 1994 Bomb, Iowa State University’s yearbook, that describes the National Coming out Day rally on campus on October 11, 1994.

Caption for photograph of a white male in top right part of page: lgb student services coordinator christopher james speaks about being bisexual at coming out day. photo by mike king. "LGBA: taking the next step" by theresa wilson. While diversity became a dominant issue on campus, the issue of acceptance for lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans gender persons remained hidden. At least it did until one day in October when the LGB community took center stage. The Lesbian/ Gay /Bisexual Alliance held its annual Coming Out Day Oct. II, in conjuntion with National Coming Out Day. Approximately 100 students, faculty and staff attended a rally south of the Campanile to show their support for the LGB community. Speakers encouraged people to "come out" to friends, relatives and acquaintances. The theme of the event was "Taking the Next Step." LGBA Vice President Chuck Bevolo, one of the organizers of Coming Out Day, said the theme had many connotations. "It entails a lot of different things," Bevolo said. "It means something different for each person. Taking the next step can mean coming out of the closet to yourself and to your friends. It can mean telling someone else you care about what you have already told your family and friends so they know what you do. It can mean becoming active. It involves the coming out process, a process of steps that you must take one at a time." People from throughout the campus and the state of Iowa spoke at the rally. Bill Crews, mayor of Melborne, Iowa, encouraged people to be active in supporting the LGB community. Celia Naylor-Ojurongbe, adviser for the Margaret Sloss Women's Center, read a poem written for the rally. Speakers discussed the different aspects of being a lebian, gay, bisexual or trans gender person. LGBA also presented a Tuesday Topic session at the Margaret Sloss Women's Center and held a social dinner at Pizza Kitchens. Jeanine Bessette, LGBS adviser, attended the rally and said she found comfort in being surrounded by people who supported her lifestyle. "The Coming Out Day rally is a day of celebration in my life and a day that says it is OK to be who you are. It gives the opportunity to come out to people and let people know. It gives the LGB community a chance to celebrate who they are." "I really enjoyed the speakers from all different walks of life. They talked about their personal experiences. Allies talked about their support and working for our rights. I just liked the atmosphere." Bevolo said one message dominated the rally. "The predominant message was that it is OK to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and it is OK to be yourself and who you are. Doing that means being honest with yourself, your friends and your family. It is not always easy and it is not always pleasant, but it must be done, and people are willing to help."

 

At the end of the page, Chuck Bevolo, the LGBA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Alliance) Vice President said:

The predominant message was that it is OK to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and it is OK to be yourself and who you are.

Below are some current Iowa State University LGBTQIAA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, Asexual, Ally)  student organizations and resources:

The Iowa State University LGBTQA+ Faculty & Staff Association was created for faculty & staff who are supportive of the LGBTQ+ community.

For more information on the history of LGBTQ+ student organizations at Iowa State, check out a prior blog post “LGBT Month” written in 2015. Or drop by our reading room to conduct more research. We’re open Monday-Friday from 9-5.


A (Very) Brief History of the Hub

This summer, the Hub is once again getting an update. ISU Dining is altering the interior layout and renovating the existing seating areas in order to reduce congestion. We who work in Special Collections and University Archives take particular interest in the Hub, since it is so easy for us to glance down from our fourth floor reading room windows in Parks Library to check on our next-door neighbor. The Hub is rather small compared to the large buildings surrounding it, but the humble Hub has a very active 126 year history.

Photograph of the Hub as it appeared shortly after it was built. The Dinkey is waiting at the station for people to board.

This picture shows the Hub sometime around 1900. The Dinkey is at the platform waiting for people to board and the Marston water tower is visible in the background. (University Photograph Collection, Box 251)

Few buildings on campus have had such a wide variety of uses as the Hub. Constructed in 1892, the Hub originally served as the college bookstore, post office, and depot for the small steam railway, affectionately known as the Dinkey, that ran from campus to downtown Ames.

Student getting an ice cream treat from a vending machine in the Hub in 1960.

Vending machines arrived in the Hub in 1959. Students had their choice of ice cream, candy, milk, soda, and other goodies. An ISU Daily article from the early 1960s stated that students chose soda pop to milk by almost 2 to 1. Go figure! (University Photograph Collection, Box 144)

Over time, the Hub was moved, added onto, and renovated to fit the needs of a growing campus. The bookstore vacated in 1958 for more spacious environs in the Memorial Union, the post office moved out five years later to a new office in Campustown, and food first came to the Hub in 1959 when vending machines moved into the building. Over the following decades, the Hub would also be home to a copy center, a ticket office, and the University Traffic Office. A dedicated outdoor seating area was added in 1983 signaling the space as a frequent gathering area for students.

The Hub as it appeared in 1983 with Morrill Hall in the background.

This picture shows the Hub as it appeared in 1983 after the outdoor seating area was added. This is what the Hub looked like when I was a student in the 1990s. (University Slide Collection, Box 9)

Even in the last 15 years that I have worked in the Library, I have been witness to several significant changes at the Hub. In 2008, the interior was completely renovated, incorporating a grill and coffee shop and an addition of a north wing for added seating. Six years later the exterior seating area would get a major revamp. The current round of improvements will see the end of vending machines in the Hub after a nearly 60-year run, but food and coffee will still be served at the Hub.

A view of the Hub, 2018.

This is the view of the Hub from the Special Collections and University Archives reading room. It’s not uncommon for our staff to wander over to the windows to see what’s going on outside when we need to stretch our legs a bit. (Photo courtesy of Brad Kuennen, 2018)

Additional information on the history of the Hub may be found in several places in Special Collections and University Archives. The Facilities Planning and Management Buildings and Grounds Files, RS 4/8/4 is a great collection to start with for any research on campus buildings. An excellent book titled The Iowa State University Campus and Its Buildings, 1959-1979, by former University Architect H. Summerfield Day is also an excellent first place to start. The archives also has historic photographs and other files that may be of interest to those looking for information on campus buildings. We would love to see you stop by to start your own research project on the Hub!


#TBT Dairy Month

Tomorrow kicks off Dairy Month, and today’s #Throwback Thursday post includes links to posts of Dairy Months past.

Iowa State Dairy circa 1905 (University Photographs, box 639).

Here are some prior posts we’ve done to celebrate Dairy Month:

Fun Facts

  • A cow is more valuable for its milk, cheese, butter, and yogurt than for its beef.
  • All 50 states have dairy farms.
  • Dairy is the 5th largest agricultural business in Iowa.
  • 99% of the ~1,400 dairy farms in Iowa are family-owned.
  • Dairy Month started out as National Milk Month in 1937, to promote drinking milk of course.
Black-and-white photo of a man (presumably a student) sitting on a stool, wearing overalls, work shirt, and cap milking a cow a red and white spotted cows. The pair are flanked by cows on either side.

Undated photograph (University Photographs RS 9/13 Food Technology).

Check out how ISU Extension and Outreach are celebrating Dairy Month.

References for Fun Facts:

“Celebrate Dairy Month in June”  by Iowa State University Extension & Outreach 

Dairy Month media kit by the International Dairy Foods Association


One Year Later: NHPRC-funded Project to Improve Access to Archival Collections & Their Descriptions

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you may have noticed a number of posts this past year related to our project transferring SCUA’s finding aids (descriptions of archival collections) into an archives management system. Not only is the goal of this project to make it easier for everyone to find collections of interest, but it will also make it far easier for staff to manage the collections behind-the-scenes. We’ve reported on what the project is, and highlighted a few interesting encounters along the way. We’re just about a year into the project, which began June 1, 2018, and you may be curious about what is happening backstage, and when will you be able to see the results?

Caitlin Moriarty, the project archivist hired for the project, has been hard at work transferring the finding aids from the Microsoft Word versions into the new archives management system. (Currently, the finding aids are maintained in both their Microsoft Word versions – the official version, and their publicly displayed versions online in HTML.) While the bulk of the project’s work involves a fair share of tedious data-entry -type work, Caitlin also needs to remain aware of the finding aids she’s working with and how well they’re going to transfer into the archives management system (although SCUA has tried to create consistent finding aids throughout the years, close to 50 years of finding-aid-creation by various authors means they’re not all the same, nor are they, alas, perfect!).

GarciaFAs.JPG

Shown above are 2 versions of the same finding aid for the Pilar A. Garcia papers. On the left is the public interface for the new system, and on the right is the current system. The display is fairly similar, although the new system has a left-hand navigation bar which makes it far easier to navigate within the finding aids’ container listings, especially those of large collections.

In addition to adapting the finding aids for the new system, Caitlin is also in charge of a whole variety of tests to make sure that things are done properly – both for the finding aids themselves, and how they are encoded within the system so all of the behind-the-scenes work can be done as smoothly as possible. For instance, if the system is not encoding the finding aids properly – this may mean that when the finding aids are shared with bibliographic utilities such as this one, they won’t be displayed properly and might not make a whole lot of sense to people.  Caitlin has also been working with the University Archivist, Brad Kuennen, to make sure the university records are easily navigable within the system.

Curious to see what this new system will look like?  If all goes well, we’ll be having a soft launch of the system this November.  Although more work will need to be done after this date, a fair number of the finding aids will be in the system at this point. All of the manuscripts were entered by the end of last year, and we’re in the process of getting the university archives finding aids, which are a bit more tricky, into the system.

In the meantime, here’s a small glimpse at what is to come.  Below is the Google search bar (see the upper right “Search Special Collections) which is used to search the entire SCUA website, including all of the finding aids – notice there is no way to limit the search to a specific field, such as creator, dates, etc.:

SCUAGoogleSearchBarArrow.JPG

The new system also has a quick search option, similar to the one-stop shop of the Google search (however, it will only be searching finding aids – not the entire SCUA website).  There is also an advanced search, which offers a variety of search options, including those shown below:

SKCAsearch.JPG

What else is happening behind-the-scenes? Quite a few things we do not have time to cover in this post, but suffice it to say that, as with any  major project, there are problems to solve, reports to write, deadlines to meet, and timelines to adjust. Stay tuned for additional updates & blog posts on the NHPRC-funded project to migrate SCUA’s finding aids into a brand new system!

nhprc-logo-l

This project has been generously funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).


The Limits of Looking: Landmarks in Iowa History and the White Gaze

By Katie Prout

As the AV and Film Preservationist for ISU’s Special Collections and University’s Archives, I often come across visual and aural content I am tasked to preserve that is beautiful, interesting, and insightful. But sometimes content is the opposite of all those things. So when I came across Herb Hake’s episode Landmarks in Iowa History: Spirit Lake Massacre, a kinescope 16mm black-and-white print, I felt compelled to provide a rebuttal of its narrative. To that end, I am very excited to introduce Katie Prout as my guest blogger. Katie is a writer and graduate of the University of Iowa’s Nonfiction Writing Program. She’s currently working on a book about addiction, inheritance, and ghosts. You can read more about her take on Spirit Lake at LitHub. -Rosie Rowe

“If you go to Antigua as a tourist, this is what you will see.” This is the opening line of Jamaica Kincaid’s searing book-length essay A Small Place, and this is what echoed in my head as I watched and then re watched “Landmarks in Iowa History: Spirit Lake Massacre.” Kincaid’s book, an anti-tourist travelogue and history of her native Antigua, reverts the gaze of power by putting the white tourist, the white colonizer, under her critical lens. You think you can know a people just by looking? Fine. Let me take a look at you.

The people doing the looking in “Landmarks in Iowa History: Spirit Lake Massacre” are the tourists in this scenario, though perhaps they wouldn’t see themselves that way, and it’s through their gaze that we, the viewers, are invited to look at an event known as the Spirit Lake Massacre. This short film is one of a series produced by WOI-TV and Iowa State Teachers’ College designed to be a supplemental educational tool for teaching Iowa history in public schools. This film, then, is the official narrative, The Facts of What Happened not to be questioned. It’s easy to imagine children bent over their desks, tongues in the corners of their mouths as they strain to recall what they learned from “Landmarks” for their teacher’s test. The facts, loosely, are this: The winter 1857 was a time of starvation in northwestern Iowa, both for the white settlers who were homesteading beyond federally determined borders and for the native peoples who had first called that land home. That March, members of the Wahpekute Dakota raided the settlers for food, possibly also for revenge for loved ones who died by the hands of white settlers and soldiers—those of Inkpaduta (the man leading the raid) not the least among them. At the three day’s end, over thirty settlers were dead; four white women were kidnapped and held for ransom. Among those four was a girl; a thirteen year-old named Abbie Gardner.

This much is true. It’s also true that tourism has long figured into the economy of  Iowa; indeed, the Gardner family cabin—the essential heart of the Spirit Lake Massacre, the state’s last indigenous-settler conflict in Iowa—later became the state’s first tourist attraction. But is this the truth the film is directing us to see? What does the camera’s lens hide, and what does it really reveal?

From the beginning, “Landmarks in Iowa History: Spirit Lake Massacre” is, knowingly or not, is concerned with who is looking at who and the limits of what can be known through that gaze. The viewer watches the tv (or in my case, the laptop screen). After the opening credits, the camera shows us a white man looking through another camera in turn. We watch him watch nothing. This man is teacher and historian Herb Hake, one of the show’s two co-hosts, and he’s pretending to do that time-honored tourist tick—take photos of a historic site. After a beat, Hake straightens up and winds his camera as he smiles sheepishly into ours. “Well boys and girls, it’s another beautiful day to take pictures, isn’t it?” Dressed in a jacket and cap, as though he’s greeting us from the Iowan outdoors, the host in fact stands on a studio stage. Behind him, a not-quite life-sized backdrop of the Gardner Cabin gleams, shiny with shellacked light. “Today, we’re going to take pictures of this Gardner cabin. You see it here in the background,” Hake says, gesturing to the blown-up photograph behind him. The studio lights invoke sunlight, the photograph of the cabin is a facsimile of the real thing, and the cabin itself is a stand-in for Abbie Gardner, the only survivor of the family who once called the cabin home, and from whose memoir much of the information shared on “Landmarks in Iowa History: Spirit Lake Massacre” is obtained. “As the announcer said, we are in the Great Lakes region today.” As Hake speaks, the gaze of the camera stays narrow enough to hide the stage wiring from our view, but not so narrow that we can’t see co-host Irving Hart’s elbow waiting in the lower left-hand corner of the screen. Specific locations in the Great Lakes region are named to further assist the construction of our belief.

With this, the viewer enters the white imagination, but that imagination is presented as fact. Hake-as-host is grave and charming, a kind of history-loving Mr. Rogers, but the imaginative play presented before us is no game. When dealing with the magic of television, how are we to understand the reality of the warfare described? What are the young students, for whom this film was originally intended, to take away? The film goes on to present more facsimiles, reproductions, artifacts that are similar and or closely related to the real thing, but that thing they are not. In “Landmarks,” the viewer is caught in the strange place of being asked to believe but also to do the work of creating a thing to believe in. We’re to take as fact what we see, but what we see is itself a stand-in, a reproduction, a retelling of the real thing.

Here’s why this matters. In an era of fake news, the more difficult work is in looking at an incident of violence not as an isolated aberration, but as a complex response to a chain of events that stretches back and forth in time. This film was made in the 1950s, but historians should know that in any decade. The hosts of “Landmarks,” describe the violence perpetrated by the Wahpekute against the settlers in detail, with words like “ruthless,” and “dragged,” but they don’t explain that the federal government was terribly late on annuity payments to the tribe, payments that might’ve been able to keep the tribes from having to choose between raids and starvation. Hake describes Inkpaduta a “big, ugly-looking Indian,” inviting the viewer to imagine all kinds of racist caricatures, but he doesn’t explain that this “ugliness” comes from horrific smallpox scars, a European disease sometimes deliberately introduced to indigenous populations by colonizers as a method of biowarfare. The camera eventually shows us a picture of a memorial near the Gardner cabin, constructed in memory of the settlers who died; the memory of the Wahpekute is represented to the arrow-shaped stone at the top of the memorial, reducing them to nothing more than weapons, objects of death.

Towards the end of the film, the camera lingers on a picture Hake tacks up to an easel. The picture is of one of the cabin’s inside walls. On this wall, an oil painting hangs, depicting burning cabins, teepees, and cold snow. Again, we have our gaze directed to another reproduction, but this one was created by a survivor who was there. Remember Your History, Gardner admonished. She painted these words on the bottom of a painting much like this one, one of a series of scenes from the memories that haunted her. This film brought to my mind Kincaid’s A Small Place, but Gardner, a very different woman, also wrote down her observations of a land and its history; first as a settler, then as a captive of the people who her kind forcibly replaced:

“In [writing this memoir], I hope to benefit myself, pay a lasting tribute to the memory of those whose lives were consecrated to civilization, and save from oblivion the historical matter within these pages.”

History, as is so often said, is written by the victors, and it seems that educational television programming is too.  While Gardner was absolutely a victim, it is her written testimony of the conflict that has been preserved and saved, and it is this version that is preserved and uplifted by “Landmarks.” Nowhere in her above sentence, quoted from the beginning pages of her memoir, is there mention of the lives of the Wahpekute; their version of history is not the “historical matter” Gardner is concerned with saving from oblivion. Working to recognize indigenous experiences and perspectives alongside those of white settlers would undoubtedly lead to another kind of conflict; an ideological one, with educators and historians striving to understand who shares what responsibility in violence, and why, and what can be done to repair that violence rather than replicate it again. This kind of history would create programming less easily reduced to symbols, more uncomfortable for some viewers to look at, but perhaps it would show us something more true.


#TBT High School Hopscotch

On the back of today’s Throwback Thursday photograph is written “High School. Hop-scotch- a popular challenge [indecipherable word].”

Young women playinig hopscotch in school uniforms on sidewalk in what looks like a neighborhood. Some students in distance are sitting down and cars are parked on the curb. Black-and-white photo. No date.

University Photographs, box 793.

No date for this photograph. When do you think it was taken?

Have a hankering for air-conditioning and old photographs? Drop by our reading room and dive into our University Photographs! We’re open Monday-Friday from 9 to 5.


Rare Book Highlights: Books from Dean Warren B. Kuhn

Many in the Ames and Parks Library communities were saddened to hear of the passing earlier this year of Warren B. Kuhn, former Director and Dean of the library (1967-1989). Dean Kuhn was always a strong supporter of the Special Collections department, which was established at Iowa State University Library early in his tenure as library director (1969). Over the years, he personally donated a number of rare books to Special Collections, strengthening its holdings in the humanities. These include, among others, works by Charles Dickens in their original weekly or monthly parts–Master Humphrey’s Clock (1840-1841), Bleak House (1852-1853), Little Dorrit (1855-1857)–and 32 1st editions of George A. Henty’s (18332-1902) popular adventure novels.

A small stuffed animal in the shape of a red cardinal mascot wearing a yellow shirt "Iowa State" in red letters, sits with an assortment of tiny books.

ISU mascot Cy sits with an assortment of miniature books from Warren B. Kuhn.

Special Collections and University Archives is again indebted to Dean Kuhn for a final gift of books that he left to our department in his trust. Included in that gift are a number of miniature volumes, which I will highlight in today’s post.

Holy Bible. Novum esu Christi Domini Nostri Testamentum. 1628.

Size: 3 3/16″ x 1 7/8″

This New Testament in Greek is one of the smallest ever printed. This edition is known for its fine Greek type by French printer and type designer Jean Jannon at Sedan.

The Holy Bible. Glasgow: David Bryce & Son, 1896.

Size: 1 11/16″ x 1 1/8″

David Bryce & Son were among the world’s most prolific printers of miniature books using the photolithographic process to print miniature versions of full-size books. This is a tiny facsimile of the Oxford University Press’s Nonpareil 16mo Bible, and it includes illustrations by G.A. Birch.

English Dictionary. Glasgow: David Bryce & Son, [ca. 1893].

Size: 1″ x 3/4″ (book); 1 1/4″ x 7/8″ (case)

This English Dictionary, also published by David Bryce & Son, is claimed to be the smallest English dictionary in the world. This copy is preserved in its original sterling silver case with inset magnifying glass. It is fitted with a tiny ring to be carried on a gentleman’s watch chain.

London Almanack. London: The Company of Stationers, 1790.

Size: 2 9/16″ x 2 5/16″ (book); 2 7/8″ x 2 1/2″ (slipcase)

The Company of Stationers published these miniature almanacks for some 200 years, engraved throughout and often finely bound. Bound with red and blue leather onlays and gold tooling with a matching slipcase. The almanacks contained the phases of the Moon, days of the month, Saints days, and times of High Water at London Bridge.

Iowa State University Library Special Collections and University Archives is so grateful for the support of Warren B. Kuhn throughout his time living in Ames. He will be missed!