A Welcome to Rosalie Gartner, Our Lead Processing Archivist

Rosalie Gartner on vacation last summer in Scotland (courtesy of Rosalie Gartner).

Rosalie Gartner joined the SCUA team on November 15, 2017 as the Lead Processing Archivist. She moved here from Boston, Massachusetts, where she has lived for the past 6 years. Originally from Colorado, she moved to Boston to attend Simmons College, where she earned her MS in Library Science with a concentration in Archives Management. After graduation, she worked at Emerson College for several years, doing everything from course instruction to processing to records management.  In her free time, she enjoys reading (of course), sewing, and traveling. Despite the extreme cold, Rosalie is happy to be here! And we are super ecstatic to have her here!!


#TBT Parks Library in the winter

Here is a #Throwback Thursday photograph of the Parks Library in the winter. This image depicts the entrance facing Morrill Road, which is no longer a working entrance.

black-and-white wintry scene showing students in coats exiting and entering the library.

Parks Library at Iowa State University, undated. (University Photographs, box 258).

 

Today is December 21, Winter Solstice, and currently we do not have any snow on the ground. According to today’s forecast, we are expecting a wintry mix, so stay warm & travel safe everyone!


Spotlight on the Presidents’ Papers – Adonijah Welch

President Adonijah Welch, undated (University Photographs, RS 2/1/A).

In light of the debut of Special Collections & University Archives (SCUA) “Ask Adonijah” piece in the Iowa State Daily earlier this month, I thought I’d put a spotlight on Iowa State University’s first president, Adonijah Welch, and his papers. Here are earlier SCUA blog posts written about him or his collection:

CyPix: Iowa State’s First President, Adonijah Welch

Now online: President Welch’s address to first graduating class

For the Morrill Act’s 150th Anniversary: Now Online – Papers of Iowa State’s First President, Adonijah Welch

Welch’s papers document his life at the university and the university’s early history.

Here’s a fun, undated clipping found in the Adonijah Welch Papers that suggests his method of arranging the trees on campus were from scattering potatoes around and planting a tree where a potato fell:

Clipping from the Sunday Register, undated (RS 2/1, box 1, folder 1).

Whether or not that story is a tall tale, we will likely never know.  Nevertheless, it is an entertaining story and there are surely more treasures and hidden facts to discover in the Adonijah Welch papers; just stop by Special Collections and University Archives to see for yourself!

 


Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act #PubMedia50 @amarchivepub: Audiovisual Preservation

Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) have joined the American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s month-long celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary by posting content throughout the month of November to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! This is our fifth and last post commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 and this week I’m highlighting some recent actions we’ve taken to preserving our audiovisual collections, which includes our collections related to public broadcasting.

For our current initiatives, we’ve been focused on audiovisual preservation. Last spring, we hired Rosie Rowe, our Audiovisual Preservation Specialist. This is a new position, charged with providing guidance on our audiovisual preservation and access workflow.

AV digitization workstation 1

Video Preservation Rack (Courtesy of Brad Kuennen).

AV digitization workstation 2

Audio Preservation Rack (in process) (Courtesy of Brad Kuennen).

Through the acquisition of equipment from other campus units and purchasing other needed tools, Rosie has constructed a Video Preservation Rack. She has developed a digitization workflow and is currently training students to assist with some of that work. She is in the process of constructing an audio preservation workstation. Through her initiative and in collaboration with other department staff, she has developed an audiovisual access policy based on principles of best practices for preservation, identified priority collections for digitization, and improved intellectual control over collections. This work will greatly benefit our audiovisual collections so that they can be better preserved, managed, and shared.

This post was co-written by Rachel Seale, outreach archivist, & Brad Kuennen, university archivist.

 


Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act #PubMedia50 @amarchivepub: Radio Broadcasting

Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) have joined the American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s month-long celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary by posting content throughout the month to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! This is our second post commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 and this week I’m highlighting some finding aids for our collections related to noted local and regional radio broadcasters.

John D. “Jack Shelley Papers, RS 13/13/55

Jack Shelley, 1965 (University Photographs RS 13/13/55).

John D. “Jack” Shelley was born in Boone, Iowa on March 8, 1912. He graduated from Boone High School (1929), and earned a Bachelor of Journalism Degree from the University of Missouri at Columbia (1935). After a short stay with the Iowa Herald in Clinton, Iowa, Shelley went to work for WHO radio in Des Moines, Iowa. He was assistant news director for five years, then became news director for both radio and television until he left in 1965. Shelley was a war correspondent in Europe and the Pacific covering World War II. He interviewed hundreds of combat soldiers in both theaters. Shelley recorded one of the first broadcast interviews with crew members of the airplanes that dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. He was aboard the battleship U.S.S. Missouri in Tokyo Bay to cover the Allies’ acceptance of the unconditional Japanese surrender, and was one of twenty reporters chosen to cover the atomic bomb tests at Yucca Flats, Nevada (1953). The tape recorder Shelley took along to record the event was one of the few to withstand the shock of the blast.

In 1965, Mr. Shelley joined Iowa State University as an Associate Professor of Journalism, then served as Professor until his retirement in 1982. Iowa State University honored him for his academic contributions with an Outstanding Teacher Award and a Faculty Citation from the Iowa State University Alumni Association.

Jack Shelley helped found the Iowa Broadcast News Association, an organization that honored him by establishing the Jack Shelley Award in 1971. He is a past president of the International Radio-Television News Directors Association, which he helped found, and of the Associated Press Radio and Television Association. He was president of the Iowa Freedom of Information Council (1981) and a member of a committee appointed by the Iowa Supreme Court to advise it on the use of cameras and tape recorders in court trials. He received the Broadcaster of the Year Award (1980) from the Iowa Broadcasters Association.

Herbert Plambeck Papers, RS 21/7/42

Herb Plambeck, (University Photographs RS 21/7/42).

Herbert Plambeck was born February 29, 1908 and raised in Scott County, Iowa. He graduated from Iowa State University with a major in agriculture (1936). He began his professional career as a USDA College (University) County Extension employee, but in 1935 he became Farm Editor for the Davenport (Iowa) Times Democrat. In 1936, he was named Farm Director for WHO-Radio in Des Moines, a position he held until 1970.  Plambeck was then appointed assistant to the U.S. Secretary for Agriculture where he focused on public affairs. Plambeck was a member of the U.S. Agricultural Delegation to the Soviet Union in 1955, where he made the first farm broadcast report from Russia. He repeated this feat when he delivered the first farm broadcast from China in 1976.

John C. Baker Papers, MS 546

John C. Baker was born in 1909 in Brazil, Indiana. He received his B.S. (1930) in agriculture from Purdue University. He began farm broadcasting at the Purdue radio station WBAA from 1930-1931. He also worked stints in farm broadcasting in Massachusetts, Chicago, and in the radio service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where he participated in the National Farm and Home Hour on NBC and The American Farmer on ABC. In the 1950s and 1960s, he worked as an information officer in the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Census Bureau. He published Farm Broadcasting: The First Sixty Years with Iowa State University Press in 1981.


Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act #PubMedia50 @amarchivepub: WOI Radio and Television Records

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) will be joining the American Archive of Public Broadcasting‘s month-long celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary by posting content throughout the month to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting!

This week’s post will highlight our WOI Radio and Television Records (RS 5/6/3).

WOI-AM went on the air on April 28, 1922, with regular market news broadcasts. During the next 25 years, the scope of station programming expanded to encompass all areas of Iowa State‘s activities including agricultural programming, programs for homemakers, lectures, forums, and classical music. On July 1, 1949, WOI-FM became one of the first FM stations in Iowa when it started broadcasting. In 2004, WOI Radio became part of Iowa Public Radio.

Iowa State’s WOI radio room, circa 1920s (University Photographs RS 5/6).

WOI-TV went on the air in February 1950 and for several years was the first station in central Iowa to offer a regular schedule of programming. It was the first television station owned and operated by an institution of higher learning and was noteworthy for its early experiments in Kinescope recording techniques. WOI-TV was sold to Capital Communications Company, Inc. in 1994.

Photograph of Barbara McWhorter, the VEISHEA Queen of Queens for 1951, on WOI-TV (University Photographs RS 22/12).

This collection contains correspondence, news clippings, reports, brochures and other publications, and minutes from WOI Board meetings. The records also include information on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) licensing and the tax cases in which WOI was involved. In addition, the records include scripts and other documents for various WOI Radio and Television programs, such as “The Prairie Valley Intelligencer” and “The Homemaker’s Half-Hour.” There are also audience surveys, Nielson Ratings showing the station in comparison to other area stations, and programming schedules.

 


#TBT Homecoming Pop-up Exhibition

In light of tomorrow’s Homecoming 2017 Pop-Up Exhibition, today’s post is a #Throwback Thursday to last year’s pop-up exhibition. Below are pictures from October 28, 2016.

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Last year I wrote a blog post about the preparations for Homecoming 2016 to show everyone how much work went into an exhibition, even a temporary one. This year we worked just as hard to put together an exhibit that we hope will evoke nostalgia for visiting alumni and pique the interest of current students, faculty, & staff at Iowa State University.

Please drop by tomorrow to check out what we’ve selected for display. We look forward to seeing you there!

 


Guest Instagrammer for Society of American Archivists

I was invited this week to be a guest Instagrammer for the Society of American Archivists (SAA). Founded in 1936, SAA is the oldest and largest national professional association for archives and archivists in North America.

I’ve been an SAA member since 2010 and have served on the Security Section (2013-2016) and currently serve on the Committee on Public Awareness. Special Collections & University Archives doesn’t have an Instagram account at this time, so please make sure to follow Society of American Archivist’s Instagram (@saarchivists).

This is a great time to be a guest Instagrammer, this month is American Archives Month and Homecoming Week for Iowa State University, so we should have some great posts!


American Archives Month

American Archives Month began in 2006 and is an opportunity for archivists to promote their collections and the profession.

This month you have many opportunities to engage with your Special Collections & University Archives staff and collections!

  • #AskAnArchivistDay! Tomorrow, October 4th, archivists around the country will take to Twitter to respond to questions tweeted with the hashtag #AskAnArchivist. Tweet your questions to @ISU_Archives and include #AskAnArchivist.

  • The Bomb Transcribe-a-thon on October 25, 12-4 PM, 134 Parks Library. Hosted by Digital Initiatives, and featuring Brad Kuennen, University Archivist, who will talk about the history of the The Bomb.
  • Homecoming Pop-up Exhibition on October 27, 1-4 PM, 405 Parks Library. Check out our unique items on Iowa State history & student life in the 1960s.
  • Halloween Exhibition & Trivia on October 31, 11 AM – 2 PM, 405 Parks Library. Check out what chilling & thrilling items we’ll have on display, answer some trivia questions, and win some prizes.

Other ways you can celebrate Archives Month with us:

If you’re working in an archives or cultural heritage institution and would like ideas on how to celebrate visit: https://www2.archivists.org/initiatives/american-archives-month-the-power-of-collaboration.

 

 


#Flashback Friday – Iowa State vs. Iowa

Tomorrow is the Iowa State vs. Iowa football game. Wednesday’s post detailed the history behind the rivalry. Today’s Flashback Friday photograph is of an Iowa versus Iowa State football game in Ames at Clyde Williams Field.

Photograph of an Iowa versus Iowa State football game in Ames at Clyde Williams Field.

Drop by our reading room to look at more football photographs in our University Photograph collection. We’re open Monday-Friday from 9-5.