Congratulations Petrina Jackson!

SCUA Department Head, Petrina Jackson, has been elected to Society of American Archivists Council! She will serve a 3-year term, 2018-2021. Join us in congratulating her!


Getting to know your film! Preserving The Champion 16mm A-B roll with ¼” soundtrack

Rosie Rowe, our A/V Preservation Specialist, did a guest blog post for the Parks Library Preservation Blog. Check it out!

Parks Library Preservation

Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 2.44.32 PM Frame still of ‘The Champion’ with ‘burnt-in’ opening title

When you’re going to digitally preserve a film (or a film series or an entire film collection), the important first step is to gather information on your film. Is your film 16mm, 35mm, 8mm, or 9.5mm, etc.? Is it color or black-and-white? Do you have the original negative, or only a print? Is the magnetic soundtrack available? If you only have an optical soundtrack, is it a negative or the positive? The list goes on – and the information can get pretty granular – but to keep this post simple, I’ll focus on the basics for a single film with an exciting title: The Champion.

A-Roll_Champion Frame still of ‘The Champion’ A-Roll (16mm Reversal)

The Champion was filmed in 1971 by Jim Doran, a student in the Department of Speech and Telecommunicative Arts at ISU. It features wrestling prodigy Dan Gable…

View original post 410 more words


Women’s History Month: Pilar Angeles Garcia

On March 2, 2018, a group of Iowa State University students presented at the 2018 Iowa State Conference on Race and Ethnicity (ISCORE). In their presentation, “Lost Stories: Women of Color at Iowa State University,”the students listed accomplishments of women of color at ISU and encouraged the university to recognize the achievements of women of color who have contributed to the success and innovation of the university. Their session included the story of Pilar Garcia, who had worked at Iowa State in the Department of Food and Nutrition from 1950-1991. I had come across this collection by accident in my first year here as outreach archivist and noted it because Garcia was born in the Philippines, like my mother. In honor of Women’s History Month, I wanted to put a spotlight on Pilar Garcia and her papers.

Pilar Angeles Garcia was born on November 4, 1926, in Manila, the Philippines. Her father, Gaudencio Garcia, served as a professor of international and political law, and her mother, Maria Paz Angeles Garcia, was a high school biology teacher. She is the second oldest of ten children.

Garcia’s high school education was interrupted by WWII. There is a note she wrote and included in her papers, when describing photographs from her childhood (RS 12/6/53, box 4, folder 2):

All earlier records were destroyed during WWII when our family home burned to the ground.

Pilar Garcia graduated from the University of the Philippines at Manila, in 1949, with a B.S. in pharmacy. During this time she earned the Barbour Scholarship, which sent her to the University of Michigan. This prestigious scholarship celebrated it’s 100th anniversary last year. One year later she earned the Master of Science degree in botany at the University of Michigan.

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Garcia then relocated to lowa State University, where she completed her studies in nutrition and worked as a graduate assistant. After she completed the M .S. and Ph.D., in 1952 and 1955 respectively, she immediately served as research associate in the Department of Food and Nutrition at ISU.

In 1957, Garcia became an assistant professor at ISU and in 1961 she was promoted to associate professor. It was not until 1974 that she was promoted to full professor. Throughout her academic career, Garcia spent her time researching and teaching courses about the effects of nutrition on people, primarily women. In 1978, she took a six-month faculty leave at the University of the Philippines at Los Banos College, Laguna, in order to conduct research on nutritional conditions of the rural, elderly poor. She earned a faculty citation from the lowa State Alumni Association in 1970 and won the Amoco Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award in 1986. Pilar Garcia retired in December 1991. In a letter written by Garcia she stated, in regards to her time at Iowa State, that (RS 12/6/53, box 1, folder 1 ):

Teaching undergraduate courses and interacting with students gave me the greatest joy and satisfaction

To read more about Pilar Garcia’s life and work at ISU, drop by the reading room! We’re open Monday-Friday, 9-5.


Tuesday Tip for beginning researchers: Yearbooks & Newspapers

Today’s blog post is a research tip for beginning researchers.We often advise students who are researching student life or campus life to take a look at the yearbooks. However, the yearbooks often make veiled references to events without providing full information.

Title of page is "king's dead - did we react with a purpose" and paragraph: "Martin Luther King was dead! Riots, looting, and violence spread across the nation. How was our campus going to react? Everyone knew the situation was the proverbial firecracker ready to be lit. Yet, there were no riots; but a silent vigil, there was no looting; but a memorial march, there was no violence; but a few broken glasses. We took the time to dedicate ourselves to the advancement of ideals Doctor King stood for. It has been over a year since we first declared our objectives. Isn't it time to stop again, judge our progress and rededicate ourselves to those ideals?" Top right black-and-white photograph, one of a young Black woman speaking and 3 older white men in suits sitting underneath her,caption says: "Pat Alford sings a tribute to Doctor King before some 350 people at a special memorial service." Second photograph, black-and-white, bottom of page, has men and women marching holding up signs one partially says "Let Freedom" others say "Black" and "White" caption: "Iowa State students, faculty, and Ames townspeople begin their memorial march from Ames to Des Moines."

Page 16 from the 1969 Bomb book 1. This page describes reactions on campus when Martin Luther King was assassinated.

To dig into further details on the silent vigil, memorial march and “a few broken glasses” mentioned in the yearbook, one would need to find corroborating documentation. I find the best documentation of student life is the student newspaper, the Iowa State Daily. Below is an article that was used in an earlier blog post, Formation of the Black Student Organization at ISU. The protest organized by Black students on campus led to the formation of the Black Student Organization (now the Black Student Alliance) at ISU.

Iowa State Daily, Twelve Pages, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, Saturday, April 6, 1968, Vol. 97, No. 118. Headline: Union is site of unexpected demonstration. By Staff Writers. Reaction to the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., was seen on the Iowa State Campus yesterday in the form of an active demonstration in the Commons, Memorial Union, and a silent vigil on the steps of Beardshear Hall. The Commons demonstration began about noon as 40 to 50 Negroes, most of them students, filed in, took trays with glasses of water and orange juice and then sat down at tables. All were dressed in dark clothing, many in suits. As the demonstrators pulled their tables together, surrounding students moved away, giving them the area. Toast: Black Unity. All demonstrators then stood; one Negro proposed a toast to "black unity on campus." Then before the disbelieving stares of onlookers, they threw their glasses on the floor, turned over the tables and chairs and walked out. After their departure, Union workers rushed out to clear the scattered broken glass and trays and pick up the overturned tables and chairs. One onlooking student reacted, "What was the purpose of all of this? What did they expect to accomplish? His answer from one woman was the cry, "You ask what they do it for? My God, that's what's wrong with all of us!" Black Students' Statement. A statement about the demonstration was issued by Bruce Ellis, Math 3. It read: "We, the Black Students of Iowa State University, are here to awaken YOU to the conditions and consequences of the situation which has led to the violent death of our non-violent leader, the Most Reverent Dr. Martin Luther King Jr." The statement was signed "Afro-American Students of Iowa State University." This group was formed late Thursday night and elected Ellis as their chairman. At Beardshear, about 250 students gathered for a vigil of silence from noon to 12:30 p.m. Negroes Absent. At the top of the steps students held a sign "We Mourn for King" and a processional cross draped with a purple cloth in observence of the Lenten season. Negroes were noticeably absent. Many instructors and students wore black arm bands passed out at the Union and by United Campus Christian Ministry members who organized the vigil. UCCM members also handed out leaflets announcing the Memorial March tomorrow from Ames to Des Moines. The Rev. Mark Rutledge, UCCM minister, broke the vigil's silence, asking if anyone wanted to make a statement. At this time several students left for class. Tribute to Leadership. Robert Muehlmann, instructor of philosophy, gave a prepared speech in tribute to King's nonviolent leadership. A man, reported to be a Boone resident, read a passage from a book King wrote concerning the necessity of action in the civil rights movement. A poem relating personal reactions of the news of King's assassination compared with similar feelings at the March on Washington, D.C., during the summer of 1963 was read by Mary Francis Cochran Sci 1. In the last speech Dr. Richard Van Iten, philosophy, urged students to go home this Easter vacation and carry through on their actions there by speaking to parents, friends and city officials. "We Shall Overcome." Rutledge asked the group to sing, "We Shall Overcome" to conclude the vigil and the crows left slowly. At 12:45 p.m. as students walked to class, Carillon-neur Ira Schroeder played Chopin's "Funeral March" and two Nero spirituals. Schroeder said he wanted to play something appropriate. Later in the afternoon Don Stephens, director fo the Memorial Union, was questioned about the noon incident. He reported there was about $100 damage due to broken dishes, glasses and scarred furniture. Stephens thought the students picked the Union for the demonstration because they knew there would be a big audience there over the noon hour. "When students first gathered in the Commons," Stephens aid, "Union officials thought there would only be a sit-in or quiet demonstration. They should have gone to Beardshear," he added. Officials Discuss Demonstration. Following Friday'sdemonstration by Negro students in the Commons, University officials met with two Negro student leadres, Bruce Ellis, Math 3, and Louis Lovelace, I Ad I, to discuss the demonstration and other problems. Dr.Wilbur L. Layton, vice president for student affairs, said the two students explained the demonstration took place as a symbolic gesture to show that Negro students on campus are trying to get organized. Layton said, "University officials are very interested in communication with Negro students and are trying to understand their problems." Layton pointed out that a member of the Lake County Urban League, near Chicago, had been at Iowa State recently to talk to University officials about facilitating communications with Negro students. Set Up Future Talks. Layton said Ellis will contact him Monday to set up future conferences to discuss problems. The administrator said he did not think there would be any more active demonstrations though.

Article from the Iowa State Daily, April 6, 1968 reporting on the demonstration by a group of students at the Memorial Union the previous day.

Now that there are more details about campus’ reaction to the assassination of Martin Luther King, there are further places to research. You can look up the Black Student Organization (BSO) and Black Student Alliance Files in the collection on Student Organizations, RS 22/3/0/1 to see what further developments took place. You could check the papers of the ISU president at the time, Robert Parks, to see what files the administration kept on the protests or the BSO, or if there was any relevant correspondence worth checking out from 1968.

Where else do you think you could look for more information on how campus reacted? Leave a comment below or drop by our reading room to do some research! We’re open Monday-Friday, 9-5.


Cyclones in NFL World Championship Games #FlashbackFriday

Jared Larson pictured with his dog Kenji (courtesy of the author).

Today’s blog post was authored by our guest blogger, Jared Larson. Jared is an Ames native and student here at Iowa State. He’s been attending ISU athletic events ever since he was 5 (2002). When not hitting the books, he can be found doing writing for Wide Right & Natty Lite and also working as equipment manager for Cyclone Hockey. Jared is also a member of two dance clubs on campus (Orchesis II and Celtic Dance Society). For those wondering what his dog is named, he goes by Kenji, and he is as good a companion as he is a brother to Jared.

Cyclones that have made NFL World Championship Appearances

Iowa State has been fielding a football team ever since 1892, and out of the thousands of players that have played in Ames, less than 200 have made it to professional ranks.  Of those, about twenty have made it to an NFL Championship game. For those interested in an all-time professional list, I have assembled lists (1920s-1930s, 1940s-1950s) that go up until the 1950s .

Our first Cyclone on our list is no other than Dick Barker, who was a letter winner in 1916, 1917, and 1919. The Oklahoma City native was an offensive guard and a very good one at that. In 1919, his All-American season, he was a stalwart on the offensive line. Knute Rockne, the famed Notre Dame coach, picked Barker for his All-American squad. Dick was also a very good wrestler here, going 10-1-1 and having five pins. His only defeat came in his first ever appearance, one in which he had a broken hand.

In 1921, Barker spent his only professional year playing for both the Rock Island Independents (for two games) and also the Chicago Staleys where he wore #18. In 2002, Iowa State inducted Dick into their Athletics Hall of Fame.

Photo of Clyde Shugart in the 1937 Iowa State vs. Nebraska Football Program (Department of Athletics Football Programs, RS 24/6/0/5, SCUA).

Clyde Shugart, an Ames High grad, made waves in high school, making first-team all-state in 1934 as an offensive guard. He was a tailback in 1936, but he would switch back for both the 1937 and 1938 seasons. In the magical season that was 1938, he, along with Ed Bock, would pave the way for quarterback Everett “Rabbit” Kischer. He would garner All-Big Six honors that season.

In the 1939 NFL Draft, Clyde Shugart was selected 158th overall by the Washington Redskins. (You can see his contract here) He stayed with Washington (#51) from 1939-1944, and he never missed a game. He played in the NFL Championship against the Bears in 1940, 1942, and 1943, only to win it all in 1942. In both 1941 and 1942, Shugart was honored as a Pro Bowl member, and in 1943 he was named an All-Pro. In 2000, the Iowa High School Football Hall of Fame inducted him, and in 2004, Iowa State inducted him to their Hall of Fame. Also in 2004, Coffin Corner caught up with Shugart.

Jim Doran (center #83) in 1950 (from @CycloneFB, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics Communications).

Jim Doran was honored as All-Big Seven in 1949, and in 1950, he was All-American. In a 1949 game against Oklahoma, he caught eight passes for 203 yards. He finished his Cyclone career with 1,410 yards on 79 receptions.

Doran was selected 55th overall by the Lions in the 1951 NFL Draft. He played a critical role in four (’52, ’53, ’54, and ‘57) NFL Championship games, and he had a 3-1 record in said games. In the 1952 season, he played in 11 games, catching a football 10 times for 147 yards. He was named MVP of the ’52 Lions and also got a sack in the NFL Championship. In the ’53 Championship, he caught the game-tying touchdown that led to the Lions winning 17-16. In 1954, he played in seven games, but accrued no playoff stats. In 1957, Doran finally got a starting nod where he had 1 receiving touchdown that he traveled 78 yards to obtain. Also, on the whole of 1957 he had 33 catches for 624 yards, 5 td.

Jim Doran’s 1957 Topps card (courtesy of the author).

 

Stan Campbell was the very first good Campbell in Iowa State history, winning letters from 1949-1951. In 1951, he was named captain of the I.S.C. squad and following his strong offensive and defensive efforts, Stan would be named the only player named to First Team All-Big Seven Offense and Defense. He would also be selected to play in the East-West Shrine Game.

Photograph of Stan Campbell (RS 24/6/0/5 Football Programs, SCUA).

He was drafted 213th overall by the Lions, where he would meet up with former Cyclone Jim Doran. Fun fact: Campbell’s first contract was for $5,000, and he had to supply his own shoulder pads and cleats. In the 1957 NFL Championship season, Campbell would appear in 12 games as a lineman.

Otto Stowe was very truly the Allen Lazard of his time (1968-1970) here at Iowa State. How so? In 1970, his senior year, he had 59 catches, six receiving touchdowns, and 822 receiving yards which garnered him All-Big Eight honors. He finished his Cyclone career with 132 catches, 1,751 receiving yards, and 10 touchdowns.

Photograph of Otto Stowe (From Cyclone Sidebar, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics).

 

The Dolphins selected him 47th overall in 1971, and in his rookie season he caught five passes for 68 yards and a touchdown. He did not appear in Super Bowl VI as he was battling Hepatitis. In 1972, the famed perfect season for Miami, he had 13 catches for 276 yards, and two of those catches were touchdowns.

Matt Blair played as a monster-back while at Iowa State, and while here he had a very successful career, attaining the following honors: All-Big 8, All-American, and Defensive MVP at the 1971 Sun Bowl. He finished his career with 202 tackles, 5 interceptions, 3 fumbles forced and 3 recovered.

Professionally, he spent 1974-1985 with the Minnesota Vikings. He appeared in both Super Bowl IX and Super Bowl XI. In Super Bowl IX against the Steelers, he blocked a Pittsburgh punt that led to Minnesota’s only score. In Super Bowl XI against the Raiders, he started and finished two tackles and assisted on three tackles.

From 1974-1977, Tom Randall was a force on the defensive line accumulating 286 total tackles. He was a first team All-Big 8 selection in 1977.  In the 1978 NFL Draft, the Cowboys selected him 194th overall. He appeared in 12 games during the season and appeared in Super Bowl XIII as a substitute.

Keith Krepfle was a very reliable tight end for the Cyclones from 1971-1973. He finished his career with 94 catches for 1,378 yards and he accumulated fifteen touchdowns while here. In a 1972 game against #3 Nebraska, the Potosi native would haul in two touchdowns in a game that ended in a 23-23 tie.  In the 1974 NFL Draft, the Eagles selected Krepfle 115th overall, but instead he spent his first season with the Jacksonville Sharks who were a part of the World Football League. Keith would play in Super Bowl XV, and he would catch two passes, one of which was a touchdown that made Krepfle the first player from a college in Iowa to score a touchdown in a Super Bowl.

Dan Johnson (from Iowa State Football Facebook, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics).

Dan Johnson was a tight end at Iowa State in 1980 and 1981. He had 25 receptions which led him to 406 total receiving yards. His longest reception as a Cyclone came in 1980, with length totaling 76 yards.

The “King of Pain” as he would be known professionally, was drafted 170th overall by the Dolphins in 1982. The Minnesota native started all sixteen regular season games, and by the time Super Bowl XIX rolled around, he got the starting nod yet again. He would have three receptions on the day, the first good for 5 yards, second good for 21 yards, and third good for two yards and a Miami touchdown. Unfortunately, the rest of the Dolphins couldn’t shore up success, and they lost 38-16.

#69 Karl Nelson (from @CycloneFB, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics)

Karl Nelson is one of the best offensive lineman to ever step foot on campus when he played here from 1979-1982. As a redshirt freshman in 1979, the DeKalb, Illinois, native started at right tackle and stayed there his entire career. In 1979, he earned Freshman All-America honors by both Football News and Bluechip Magazine. He was Second Team All-Big Eight in 1980, and in both 1981 and 1982, he earned First Team All-Big Eight honors.

The New York Giants would pick him up 70th overall in the 1983 Draft, and in the 1986 season, he led the Giants to Super Bowl XXI where the New York squad beat the Broncos 39-20. In 2005, he was inducted into Iowa State’s Hall of Fame.

The Humboldt native was recruited to Iowa State to play as a defensive tackle, but after some injuries, Reimers moved to the offensive line. Reimers, along with aforementioned Nelson, helped Dwayne Crutchfield have back to back 1,000 yard seasons. In 1983, after many knee surgeries, Bruce got honored as First-Team All-Big Eight and also got invited to the Senior Bowl.

The Bengals would draft Reimers 204th overall in the 1984 Draft, and he would stay there until 1991. In Super Bowl XXIII, he would get the start next to stud left tackle, Anthony Muñoz. Unfortunately, the Bengals would lose 20-16 to the 49ers in a memorable classic. Iowa State would induct him into their Hall of Fame in 2009.

Photo of Dennis Gibson (from @CycloneFB, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics).

Dennis Gibson played at Iowa State from 1983-1986 as one of our best ever linebackers from Ankeny. He finished his career with 304 tackles, as well as six sacks and interceptions. Gibson also caused eight fumbles and recovered three of them.

In the 1987 NFL Draft, the Lions selected him 203rd overall, but instead he brought the Chargers to the Super Bowl. In the 1994 AFC Championship against the Steelers, Gibson deflected a pass on a 4th & Goal to send the Chargers to Super Bowl XXIX where he would get the starting nod. Unfortunately, the 49ers would hang 49 on San Diego and they would lose by 23. In December 2017, Gibson granted the website that I normally write for an interview for those that want to read it.

Photograph Eugene Williams Guard trading card (courtesy of author).

Gene Williams was an outstanding offensive guard from 1987-1990. He earned First-Team All-Big Eight honors in 1990. His blocking ability allowed Blaise Bryant to have massive success in his rushing attack. Gannett News honored him as an All-American in 1990, and also in 1990, he played in the Blue-Gray Classic. He is in the Iowa State Hall of Fame Class of 2012.

The Dolphins drafted him 121st overall where he teamed up with former Cyclone teammate Keith Sims. The Omaha native would spend two seasons with Miami, two more with the Browns, and he was with the Falcons when he made his Super Bowl appearance. He started in Super Bowl XXXIII but alas the Falcons fell to the John Elway led Broncos 19-34.

(Photograph from Iowa State Football Facebook, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics).

Seneca Wallace may have only spent two years at ISU, but he made enough highlight tape worthy plays to make it seem like he spent more time here. Known best for his run against Texas Tech in 2002, Seneca almost engineered a comeback against #3 Florida State in 2002, but he would be ruled against by a referee, and the Cyclones would lose 38-31.

Seneca would find himself being drafted by Seattle (110th overall) and that’s where he would appear in Super Bowl XL two seasons later.  The Seahawks would lose, but Wallace would appear in the game as a sub.

(From @CycloneFB, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics).

Ellis Hobbs III was a great defensive back for the Cyclones from 2001-2004, playing in 49 games in which he accumulated a little over 200 tackles. In his final game as a Cyclone, he had a long interception to seal the Cyclone win in the 2004 Independence Bowl over Miami (OH).

The Patriots drafted him 84th overall in 2005. In the perfect regular season of 2007 for New England, Hobbs returned a kickoff for 108 yards which at the time, was tied for an NFL record. In Super Bowl XLII, he had the interception in the game of which he returned for 23 yards.

(From @CycloneATH, courtesy of Iowa State Athletics).

Kelechi Osemele is the next Cyclone on the list, playing here from 2008-2011. He was a strong force on the offensive line, and he would be named a First-Team All-American by Sports Illustrated. He played in 49 games and had 44 consecutive starts. The Ravens would draft him 60th overall, and the rookie would be a key factor in Baltimore’s win in Super Bowl XLVII over the 49ers.

Next up is A.J. Klein who was a stud linebacker from 2009-2012. He tallied 361 tackles which is fourth most in Iowa State history. In both 2011 and 2012, he was a First Team All-Big 12 honoree. In Super Bowl 50, he played 1 defensive snap and 22 special teams snaps.

A.J. Klein (courtesy of Iowa State Athletics)

Jomal Wiltz is the final Cyclone on the list, as he played here from 2015 to 2016. He would be named Honorable Mention All-Big 12 his senior season, and he won the Al and Dean Kundson award which goes to the most outstanding defensive player at Iowa State. He was selected to appear in the College Gridiron Showcase.

Wiltz is currently on the practice squad for the Patriots, however, I’ll be keeping an eye out for him on Sunday when New England takes on the Philadelphia Eagles!

References:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/sidearm.sites/isuni.sidearmsports.com/documents/2016/5/9/15encyclopedia.pdf

https://s3.amazonaws.com/sidearm.sites/isuni.sidearmsports.com/documents/2015/5/5/Media_Guide.pdf

http://cyclones.com/sports/2015/3/2/GEN_20140101193.aspx

http://cyclones.com/sports/2015/3/2/GEN_20140101108.aspx

http://cyclones.com/news/2008/1/28/1374292.aspx

https://cyclonesidebar.wordpress.com/2017/02/03/cyclone-super-bowl-memories/

https://www.pro-football-reference.com/ (helped with rosters/pro stats)

http://cyclones.com/hof.aspx?hof=120

 

 


A Welcome to Rachael Acheson, Our Assistant University Archivist

Rachael Acheson began work as the Assistant University Archivist in SCUA on January 8, 2018. Her work will center around documentation of student life at ISU, including the collection of current and historical records from student organizations and  archiving University and student-run websites and social media pages with Archive-It. She will also assist with more general processing, outreach, and instruction.

In August 2016, Rachael earned her dual master’s degree in English (MA) and Library and Information Science (MLIS) from the University of South Carolina, where she concentrated on Archives and Special Collections, which allowed her to indulge both her fascination with rare books and textual studies along with discursive interests in transatlantic literature. While in her graduate program, Rachael taught freshman English courses and interned with the oral history and rare books departments. Rachael also had the opportunity to complete a number of amazing internships with the university libraries and local archives, including one that involved preparations to host a travelling exhibit from the Folger Shakespeare Library, which featured a First Folio.

Immediately before coming to ISU, Rachael worked in Cedar Falls, IA, where she completed a 10-month temporary assignment as the Special Collections and University Archives Librarian at University of Northern Iowa.

Here are a few fun facts about Rachael:

    1. She is currently very much out-of-practice, but she plays the harp and began college as a Harp Performance major. Mary Foss, the principal harpist of the Des Moines Symphony Orchestra and also Adjunct Professor at ISU, Drake University, and Central College, was the first of her many excellent harp teachers. As a result, Rachael had the opportunity to attend an ISU masterclass with Catrin Finch, formerly the Royal Harpist to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, when Rachael had been playing for only five months. After serving as the principle harpist for her college orchestra for four years, Rachael also performed briefly with the Central Iowa Symphony.
    2. She has a pewter-gray cat named Sterling, who enjoys standing on her head in the early hours of the morning and watching tv.
    3. She is a huge nerd about children’s and Young Adult (YA) literature, collects illustrated editions of Frances Hodgson Burnett novels, and has met Maggie Stiefvater twice.
    4. She spent a large portion of her childhood in Iowa Falls, Iowa, and so has some history of her own with Ames and likes to think she is in the process of getting better acquainted with the state as a whole.

Rachael’s literary cat, Sterling, posing for the camera.

She is excited to be back in the area. We’re excited too!


“Do[ing] Their Bit”: Iowa’s Role in the Great War opening Wednesday, January 17!

This week and next we’re installing our next exhibition, “Do[ing] Their Bit”: Iowa’s Role in the Great War, which opens Wednesday, January 17. This exhibition commemorates the 100th Anniversary of the United States involvement in World War I. The exhibition will remain open through the spring semester.

Lorraine and the rest of the Printing Services team installing our window display (Photograph by Rachel Seale).

The opening reception is Wednesday, January 17, from 6:30 to 8 p.m in 198 Parks Library. Guest speakers, Jack Lufkin and Mark Heggen will show and discuss, Deeds Not Words, their historic video about the World War I Black Officers Training Camp at Fort Des Moines. Jack Lufkin is the curator at the Fort Des Moines Museum and Education Center.  Mark Heggen is an independent filmmaker and ISU alumnus.

"Do[ing] Their Bit": Iowa's Role in the Great War. Opening reception, January 17, 2018, 6:30 p.m.in 198 Parks Library. Refreshments courtesy of Iowa State University Diversity and Inclusion

Contact Rachel Seale for questions about the exhibition or the reception.


A Welcome to Rosalie Gartner, Our Lead Processing Archivist

Rosalie Gartner on vacation last summer in Scotland (courtesy of Rosalie Gartner).

Rosalie Gartner joined the SCUA team on November 15, 2017 as the Lead Processing Archivist. She moved here from Boston, Massachusetts, where she has lived for the past 6 years. Originally from Colorado, she moved to Boston to attend Simmons College, where she earned her MS in Library Science with a concentration in Archives Management. After graduation, she worked at Emerson College for several years, doing everything from course instruction to processing to records management.  In her free time, she enjoys reading (of course), sewing, and traveling. Despite the extreme cold, Rosalie is happy to be here! And we are super ecstatic to have her here!!


#TBT Parks Library in the winter

Here is a #Throwback Thursday photograph of the Parks Library in the winter. This image depicts the entrance facing Morrill Road, which is no longer a working entrance.

black-and-white wintry scene showing students in coats exiting and entering the library.

Parks Library at Iowa State University, undated. (University Photographs, box 258).

 

Today is December 21, Winter Solstice, and currently we do not have any snow on the ground. According to today’s forecast, we are expecting a wintry mix, so stay warm & travel safe everyone!


Spotlight on the Presidents’ Papers – Adonijah Welch

President Adonijah Welch, undated (University Photographs, RS 2/1/A).

In light of the debut of Special Collections & University Archives (SCUA) “Ask Adonijah” piece in the Iowa State Daily earlier this month, I thought I’d put a spotlight on Iowa State University’s first president, Adonijah Welch, and his papers. Here are earlier SCUA blog posts written about him or his collection:

CyPix: Iowa State’s First President, Adonijah Welch

Now online: President Welch’s address to first graduating class

For the Morrill Act’s 150th Anniversary: Now Online – Papers of Iowa State’s First President, Adonijah Welch

Welch’s papers document his life at the university and the university’s early history.

Here’s a fun, undated clipping found in the Adonijah Welch Papers that suggests his method of arranging the trees on campus were from scattering potatoes around and planting a tree where a potato fell:

Clipping from the Sunday Register, undated (RS 2/1, box 1, folder 1).

Whether or not that story is a tall tale, we will likely never know.  Nevertheless, it is an entertaining story and there are surely more treasures and hidden facts to discover in the Adonijah Welch papers; just stop by Special Collections and University Archives to see for yourself!