Black History Month at Iowa State University

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Black History Month is celebrated from February 1 through February 28 starting in 1976 when the celebration was extended from a week to an entire month. Here on campus, we have a number of student organizations that celebrate Black History Month and work year round to educate campus on issues black students face today. The Black Student Government was a name that I found occurring repeatedly in the “Black History Month” folder of RS 22/03/001, so I decided to see if I could learn more about them.

On campus, the Black Student Government organized educational events, speakers, and more for the students at ISU. Their mission was to help black students on campus feel safe and at home on campus while also fighting for a better life. In 1992 the “Black Student Government” changed their name to the “Black Student Alliance” and continue to use this name on campus today.

Newspaper clipping of an article from the ISU Daily, Oct. 6, 1988, titled “Program for new Black Students discusses surviving ISU” Photograph included with article shows two female black students talking.

ISU Daily article on program sponsored by the Black Student Government. 10/6/88

During Black History Month, student organizations often work together to bring speakers, workshops, and other activities to campus. In 2000, seventeen campus groups, including the Black Student Alliance, worked together to create a range of activities celebrating Black History Month.

Flyer from February of 2000 titled “Celebrate Black History Month at Iowa State University” advertising the events for Black History Month.

Lastly, like any student organization, the Black Student Alliance is also about having fun and building a community. They often host events for students to hang out, like this “Show Me What You Got” game night! The organization is still active today with 97 student members. Each year the organization has an opportunity to attend the Big XII Conference on Black Student Government, hosted by a different Big XII school each year.

Handout advertising “Show me what you got game night” hosted by the Black Student Alliance depicting a black male holding a video game controller.

For more information on Black History Month, the Black Student Alliance/Black Student Government, or other student organizations, check out RS 22/03/001!  All of the documents from this blog piece came from Box 1 of the collection, folders “Black History Month”, “Black Student Alliance”, and “Black Student Government”.


Walking through the winters of our past #FlashbackFriday

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

For this #FlashbackFriday I thought we might dive into some pretty cool snow images from the past. I have had these images saved for a while now because I really wanted to wait until we had some snowy weather to compare them to, and boy did mother nature deliver! Students are walking through about five inches of snow to get to their classes today after the snow filled few days we have had! Snow on campus is something that every group of students will experience while studying here at Iowa State University, and while some students love the snow, others are less than excited by it.

A large group of students walking along the sidewalk on central campus that runs from Curtiss Hall to Beardshear Hall in a heavy snow fall, 1979.

From University Photographs box 328.

Here are students walking from Curtiss Hall to Beardshear Hall on central campus in 1979. While there is no other date information for this photo, it looks like they were getting some pretty serious snowfall. This scene could have been recreated yesterday with the amount of snow students were walking through at the end of the day. This photo and more snow scenes can be found in box 328 of RS 4/8/J. Currently it is not snowing, but I can see my fellow students trying to navigate the frozen world outside. Here is a look at what the view from my window on the second floor of the library is right now! While most of the students are at their early morning classes, a few are walking the sidewalks, trying to get places with the two inches of snow we gained last night.

View from the second floor windows of Parks library looking out over the snow covered free speech area, Beardshear Hall is in the background.

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

Another cool photo that I found while looking through box 328 of collection RS 4/8/J – Snow Scenes, was an almost identical photo from the first group of students walking in the snow, only this one is from 1994! These students look a little more excited about the snow, and it looks like there was less snow compared to the photo from 1979. How cool is it though that we have two almost identical photos from two separate years? I love finding these connections in the archives, you truly never know what might turn up!

A large group of students walking along the sidewalk on central campus that runs from Curtiss Hall to Beardshear Hall in the snow, 1994.

From University Photographs, box 328.

 

 

 


Welcome to 2019!

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Welcome back students! Students are back on campus, The Hub is officially reopened, and the spring semester is in full swing! With the new semester starting, we are officially moving towards warmer weather again. I know that we had a pretty cold weekend, but soon the sun will return and we can all break out our favorite pair of flip flops! Just in case you need a little warm weather inspiration to get you through the next few months, I have pulled some great photos from The Bomb, the University’s official yearbook. The Bomb was published in hard copy from 1893-1994 and physical copies can be found in our reading room! If you do not have time to visit us in person, you can find digitized copies of the Bomb here: https://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/bombs

Three people standing on a limestone cliff over a river in Ledges State Park while a fourth member watches from below.

With the spring season fast approaching, there are so many fun things that you can look forward to doing on campus. When the snow melts, you and your friends will be able to hit the trails at Ledges State Park. With the new campground renovations and the warm weather, study breaks can become weekend adventures with your friends! Check out this Ledges photo from the 1973 Bomb!

Two people trying to cross a river in Ledges State Park.

One of my favorite spring activities on campus is meeting new dogs that are out on a walk with their owners. When the weather is nice, campus is full of furry friends getting a chance to stretch their legs, taking a quick nap in the sunshine, or assisting their owners. Be sure to take your pup to campus this spring and do some people watching like this adorable duo from page 15 of the 1973 Bomb!

A student sitting with their arm around a Saint Bernard dog, both are facing away from the camera.

We all know the Iowa springs can be a little on the rainy side, but you know what they say, “April showers bring May flowers” and without those April showers, how will you get to show off your super cool umbrella? I know that I have seen some pretty cool umbrellas on campus, but check out these umbrellas on page 78 of the 1964 Bomb.

Thirteen people sitting under a large tree on campus during a rainstorm with multi patterned umbrellas.

Now, there is one part of spring that we all can agree on is great, and that is graduation! That’s right seniors, your last semester at Iowa State is here, and it is up to you to make the most of your semester. Hopefully those April showers bring us lots of May flowers for our graduation photos! Need some inspiration? Check out these photos from the 1964 Bomb and the 1973 Bomb!

So, whether it is your first semester or your last, be sure to go out and make the most of it! From classes to hanging out with friends, always try to make time for the little things, and remember, go Cyclones!

A small blonde haired child crawls on the ground behind a row of ducklings following their mother.

1989 Bomb, page 14.


Reflecting on a Semester’s Worth of Writing about Special Collections & University Archives

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Writing for Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) has been an eye opening experience. I have found photographs and manuscripts that I would have never even known about had I not started this job. Sorting through photos of campus throughout the years is so interesting, because there are thousands of them and you truly never know what you were going to find. When I came across the photo from last week’s Facebook post of the students carrying the computers through the snow, I was just casually looking for cool snow pictures and I knew that I had to share that one. Within that box, there are some other awesome photos of winters throughout history of ISU including these! The history of our campus is so rich and interesting, you just have to start looking.

When you are researching a topic, it is easy to get frustrated and lose your determination to learn about the subject. One of the hardest parts of my job so far has been researching student organizations. I have found that a lot of times, not every student organization makes it into the ISU yearbook, The Bomb. Sometimes organizations will have manuscript folders in the archives, but they won’t have anything about them within The Bomb which is incredibly frustrating when you want to find photographs of an organization. You just have to remember to keep your head up, and keep digging, because you truly never know when something unexpected is going to appear within your research that may make the struggle worth it.

Cover of book The End of Eternity by Isaaac Asimov, has mn standing in front of what looks like old radio equipment. Text on cover is in white, black, and orange, rest of cover is black-and-white.

Here is another cool cover from a book within the Margaret Young Science Fiction Collection. This is The End of Eternity by Isaac Asimov. Call Number PS 3551.S5E5x.

Something I tend to forget about when researching in the SCUA is that we have rare books. In fact, we even have a Rare Books and Manuscripts Archivist, Amy Bishop! I know that it seems pretty obvious that a place titled “Special Collections and University Archives” would have rare books, but sometimes it just totally slips my mind! However, I have been doing quite a bit of work researching the rare books recently, from the miniature book collection to the Margaret Young Science Fiction collection, and it is so much fun! There is something so cool about old books, there is always something unique about them. If I had to pick a favorite item to research, it would be rare books. I could easily spend hours going through the pages of a single book. From the cover art to the binding, something sets each book apart from the rest of them. Some books even have crazy backstories, which make them even more interesting! This job has opened me up to a world of new possibilities when it comes to working in an archival field, and specializing in Rare Books and Manuscripts is now on the top of my list.

 


Margaret Young Science Fiction Collection

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

When I was looking for something to write about for this blog post, I found myself scrolling through the Subject Guidelines when I saw the “Rare Books” heading. Recently, I have been working on my applications to graduate school and have found myself to be very interested in the programs that have a “Rare Books and Manuscript” focus, so I thought I would see what we had under the header. That’s when I found the Margaret Young Science Fiction Collection. Now, I have always been a little bit of a nerd, but when I saw that heading I knew what I would be writing about.

Margaret Young was the mother of an Iowa State University Faculty member who decided that she wanted to donate her collection to an repository who would keep her collection together. In total, there are 397 books and 35 serial titles within the collection. The head archivist at the time, Dr. Stanley M. Yates, wanted to protect the cover art of the books, so thankfully the books were brought into special collections. There are wide range of authors within the collection, including famous writers like Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clark, H.P. Lovecraft, Jules Vern, Kurt Vonnegut, and H.G. Wells.

The collection has some familiar names to those who may not read science fiction, like Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, and The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells. Other pieces within the collection include Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clark, End of Eternity by Isacc Asimov, The Circus of Dr. Lao by Charles Finney, and Out of the Silent Planet by C. Lewis. These are just a few of the examples, you can see a larger list of some of the titles here.

The covers of these books are so cool, I wish I could take pictures of all of them to show the world. However, since I can’t show you all of them, I will show you a few of the cool ones that I pulled today! A lot of these books are paperbacks, so they have to be handled with care when you open them. Book weights and cradles are available at the front desk if you wish to view some of these books!

One of my favorite books that I have found from the collection so far has to be The Island of Dr. Moreau. The famous book has had many covers over the years, but the cover art on this one is just so cool!

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If you are interested in looking at the rest of the collection, come see us! There are so many other cool books that I wish I could have listed for you all to see!

Here are the call numbers for the books that I mention above.

The Island of Dr. Moreau PR5774 .I8 1960z

Childhood’s End PR6005 .L36 C54X

The End of Eternity PS3551.S5 E5X

Fahrenheit 451 PS3503.R167 F3X


The United Native American Student Association at Iowa State University #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #ThrowbackThursday

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Did you know that November is Native American Heritage Month? Here on campus we have student organizations dedicated to various topics, but the one I am featuring today is the United Native American Student Association (UNASA). UNASA is still active on our campus today, and the organization sponsors events on campus to celebrate their heritage and to educate those around them. In the past the organization has sponsored the Symposium of on the American Indian in the University. In my research, I have found two brochures from these events. The first event that I have found in our University Archives and Special Collections was from 1973. Below is a photograph of the schedule of events! During the 1973 Symposium, there were several speakers and demonstrations given over the day.

The next event I was able to locate information on was in 1979, when UNASA sponsored the “Our Children, Our Future” event. Held on April 6 and 7 of 1979, the even was much larger than the 1973 event. While there were still speakers and demonstrations, there were also events for children, films, and other activities.

I also found an interesting article from the Iowa State Daily from October 17 (pictured below), about another event that UNASA brought to campus in 1979. For the first fall cultural event of the year, Gerald Sitting Eagle came to the university to perform a series of traditional hoop dances. You can see the article below!

“Sitting Eagle–dancing for cultural recognition,” Iowa State Daily, October 17, 1979.

While I was unable to find photos of the organization in our copies of the Bomb, there are several Iowa State Daily articles written about the organization and the events that they hosted. For more information on the United Native American Student Association, check out box 2 of collection RS 22/03/00/01!


Building History at Iowa State University

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

This August, I started working as the Curation Services Student Writer here at Parks Library. I have always loved looking at old photographs and documents, so this job has been an absolute blast for me to be working on. One of my favorite things about working this job is doing research in the Special Collections & University Archives Reading Room. While it can sometimes be challenging, finding materials is like a treasure hunt, you never know what you might find in the next folder. Recently, I have been doing a lot of research on the buildings that we have here on campus. Some of the buildings have been here since the beginning, like the Farm House, and others are still being added to! Our University Photograph collection has some amazing images of the campus during its early years, which I find fascinating to look at.

While thinking of ideas for a Facebook post, I thought it might be fun to use a picture of the library when it was first built. I knew that there had been an addition to Parks Library making it what we have on campus today, but what I did not know, was that there have been three additions to the library! The original section of the library was built in 1925, and then the three additions followed in 1961, 1969, and 1983. The 1983 addition to the library created the Parks Library that we all know and love today. While looking through the university photographs for pictures of the original library building, I found some pretty cool photos!

This photo was taken in 1922 at the future sight of the library. In the background you can see Gilman Hall, which was called Physics hall at the time. University Photographs, box 313.

In the photo below, you can see the library in the middle of its construction. This photo was taken November 26th, 1923. There are so many cool photos of the library in the University Photographs, I wish I could post all of them but sadly, I cannot. If you want to see more cool photos of Parks Library, check out the University Photographs!

University Photographs, box 313.

For some unknown reason, I tend to lean towards the older buildings on campus when I am doing my research in the Reading Room. I think that it is just because old buildings are so cool, they have so much potential for fun facts and cool photographs. Whatever the reason may be, one day I decided to look at photos of Old Music Hall. Going into the research, I knew that there was a music hall that stood somewhat close to the current Music Hall, but I had never seen any photos of it or heard any information on it. The building was built in 1870 as a home for professors, and continued to be a home for professors until 1924 when the Home Economics Department took over the building. In 1928, the Music Department moved in, and in 1929 the building was officially known as Music Hall. The Music Department continued to stay in the building until it was torn down in 1978 to build the Music Hall that we see on campus today.

Old Music Hall, photograph taken in 1978 by Jerald C. Mathew, University Photographs, box 274.

The University Archives are full of crazy cool and weird stuff that you may never know about until you start looking! While it may seem daunting at first, our staff are more than happy to help you get your search started! You never know what you may find once you start looking, you may even have a hard time stopping. So whether you want to learn the history of your favorite building on campus, or you maybe you just want to see what we have on display, stop out and see us! We would love to see you!

The Reading Room is open Monday–Friday from 9 AM – 5 PM.

 


A Welcome to Emily DuGranrut, Our NHPRC Project Archivist

Courtesy of Emily DuGranrut.

Emily is the new NHPRC Project Archivist at Iowa State, working with Special Collections and University Archives to complete a grant project to implement a new archives management system.

Emily is originally from Lima, Ohio, and comes from a large family of library and history lovers. She studied journalism and history at Ohio University and completed an internship at The New York Times before moving to Columbus, Ohio. In Columbus, she helped manage a used bookstore for three years and began working toward her MLIS at Wayne State University. She moved to Iowa in August after completing an internship at Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan, where she worked digitizing audio materials and processing photo collections. She will finish her MLIS in December. In her free time, Emily enjoys hanging out with her cats, Ace and Jack, reading, camping, and rock climbing.


Filipino American History Month

October is Filipino American History Month. The Filipino American National Historical Society has been observing October as Filipino American History Month since 1991. In 2009, Congress passed a resolution nationally recognizing October as Filipino American History Month.

Below are some photographs from newsletters from the Filipino Club & Filipino Student Association files (RS 22/3/0/1, box 1). Click on the photographs to see the full caption information.

 

Here are some previous posts highlighting Iowa State University Professor Emeritus Pilar Angeles Garcia who was born in the Philippines and had a long distinguished career at Iowa State University:


Staff Spotlight – Rosalie Gartner

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Rosalie Gartner is a familiar face that you might have seen working our front desk or hanging around our reading room here at Special Collections and University. Rosalie is the lead Processing Archivist here at Iowa State University Special Collections and Archives. Originally, Rosalie is from Colorado, where she attended Colorado State University and studied History and French. While she was there she planned to be a museum curator, however she found a love for working with documents in an archival setting, and well, the rest is history! After graduation, Rosalie moved to the east coast where she earned her M.S in Library Science with a concentration in Archives Management from Simmons College. While in school, she worked for Biogen, doing records management in the Governance department.

Rosalie Gartner on vacation last summer in Scotland (courtesy of Rosalie Gartner).

After graduating from Simmons, she began to work at Emerson College in their Archives and Special Collections for several years. After working for Emerson, Rosalie packed up her life and moved to the Midwest, a transition that she says was rather smooth when you think about moving from Boston, Massachusetts to Ames, Iowa! While she sometimes misses the city, there are pieces of Iowa that make up for the lost hustle and bustle, like farmer’s markets and ample running trails.

The Special Collections and University Archives here at Iowa State are always working on bringing in fun new projects to work on, which is Rosalie’s favorite part of the job. Something she wishes the public would know about Special Collections and Archives is that they are not scary! They love when researches come in and use the collections that they work so hard to make accessible for everyone. When Rosalie is not working up in SCUA, she can be found hanging out with her dog, cooking something up, or just laid back enjoying a good book.