The United Native American Student Association at Iowa State University #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth #ThrowbackThursday

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Did you know that November is Native American Heritage Month? Here on campus we have student organizations dedicated to various topics, but the one I am featuring today is the United Native American Student Association (UNASA). UNASA is still active on our campus today, and the organization sponsors events on campus to celebrate their heritage and to educate those around them. In the past the organization has sponsored the Symposium of on the American Indian in the University. In my research, I have found two brochures from these events. The first event that I have found in our University Archives and Special Collections was from 1973. Below is a photograph of the schedule of events! During the 1973 Symposium, there were several speakers and demonstrations given over the day.

The next event I was able to locate information on was in 1979, when UNASA sponsored the “Our Children, Our Future” event. Held on April 6 and 7 of 1979, the even was much larger than the 1973 event. While there were still speakers and demonstrations, there were also events for children, films, and other activities.

I also found an interesting article from the Iowa State Daily from October 17 (pictured below), about another event that UNASA brought to campus in 1979. For the first fall cultural event of the year, Gerald Sitting Eagle came to the university to perform a series of traditional hoop dances. You can see the article below!

“Sitting Eagle–dancing for cultural recognition,” Iowa State Daily, October 17, 1979.

While I was unable to find photos of the organization in our copies of the Bomb, there are several Iowa State Daily articles written about the organization and the events that they hosted. For more information on the United Native American Student Association, check out box 2 of collection RS 22/03/00/01!


Building History at Iowa State University

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

This August, I started working as the Curation Services Student Writer here at Parks Library. I have always loved looking at old photographs and documents, so this job has been an absolute blast for me to be working on. One of my favorite things about working this job is doing research in the Special Collections & University Archives Reading Room. While it can sometimes be challenging, finding materials is like a treasure hunt, you never know what you might find in the next folder. Recently, I have been doing a lot of research on the buildings that we have here on campus. Some of the buildings have been here since the beginning, like the Farm House, and others are still being added to! Our University Photograph collection has some amazing images of the campus during its early years, which I find fascinating to look at.

While thinking of ideas for a Facebook post, I thought it might be fun to use a picture of the library when it was first built. I knew that there had been an addition to Parks Library making it what we have on campus today, but what I did not know, was that there have been three additions to the library! The original section of the library was built in 1925, and then the three additions followed in 1961, 1969, and 1983. The 1983 addition to the library created the Parks Library that we all know and love today. While looking through the university photographs for pictures of the original library building, I found some pretty cool photos!

This photo was taken in 1922 at the future sight of the library. In the background you can see Gilman Hall, which was called Physics hall at the time. University Photographs, box 313.

In the photo below, you can see the library in the middle of its construction. This photo was taken November 26th, 1923. There are so many cool photos of the library in the University Photographs, I wish I could post all of them but sadly, I cannot. If you want to see more cool photos of Parks Library, check out the University Photographs!

University Photographs, box 313.

For some unknown reason, I tend to lean towards the older buildings on campus when I am doing my research in the Reading Room. I think that it is just because old buildings are so cool, they have so much potential for fun facts and cool photographs. Whatever the reason may be, one day I decided to look at photos of Old Music Hall. Going into the research, I knew that there was a music hall that stood somewhat close to the current Music Hall, but I had never seen any photos of it or heard any information on it. The building was built in 1870 as a home for professors, and continued to be a home for professors until 1924 when the Home Economics Department took over the building. In 1928, the Music Department moved in, and in 1929 the building was officially known as Music Hall. The Music Department continued to stay in the building until it was torn down in 1978 to build the Music Hall that we see on campus today.

Old Music Hall, photograph taken in 1978 by Jerald C. Mathew, University Photographs, box 274.

The University Archives are full of crazy cool and weird stuff that you may never know about until you start looking! While it may seem daunting at first, our staff are more than happy to help you get your search started! You never know what you may find once you start looking, you may even have a hard time stopping. So whether you want to learn the history of your favorite building on campus, or you maybe you just want to see what we have on display, stop out and see us! We would love to see you!

The Reading Room is open Monday–Friday from 9 AM – 5 PM.

 


A Welcome to Emily DuGranrut, Our NHPRC Project Archivist

Courtesy of Emily DuGranrut.

Emily is the new NHPRC Project Archivist at Iowa State, working with Special Collections and University Archives to complete a grant project to implement a new archives management system.

Emily is originally from Lima, Ohio, and comes from a large family of library and history lovers. She studied journalism and history at Ohio University and completed an internship at The New York Times before moving to Columbus, Ohio. In Columbus, she helped manage a used bookstore for three years and began working toward her MLIS at Wayne State University. She moved to Iowa in August after completing an internship at Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan, where she worked digitizing audio materials and processing photo collections. She will finish her MLIS in December. In her free time, Emily enjoys hanging out with her cats, Ace and Jack, reading, camping, and rock climbing.


Filipino American History Month

October is Filipino American History Month. The Filipino American National Historical Society has been observing October as Filipino American History Month since 1991. In 2009, Congress passed a resolution nationally recognizing October as Filipino American History Month.

Below are some photographs from newsletters from the Filipino Club & Filipino Student Association files (RS 22/3/0/1, box 1). Click on the photographs to see the full caption information.

 

Here are some previous posts highlighting Iowa State University Professor Emeritus Pilar Angeles Garcia who was born in the Philippines and had a long distinguished career at Iowa State University:


Staff Spotlight – Rosalie Gartner

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra.

This blog post was authored by Curation Services Student Writer Cassandra Anderson.

Rosalie Gartner is a familiar face that you might have seen working our front desk or hanging around our reading room here at Special Collections and University. Rosalie is the lead Processing Archivist here at Iowa State University Special Collections and Archives. Originally, Rosalie is from Colorado, where she attended Colorado State University and studied History and French. While she was there she planned to be a museum curator, however she found a love for working with documents in an archival setting, and well, the rest is history! After graduation, Rosalie moved to the east coast where she earned her M.S in Library Science with a concentration in Archives Management from Simmons College. While in school, she worked for Biogen, doing records management in the Governance department.

Rosalie Gartner on vacation last summer in Scotland (courtesy of Rosalie Gartner).

After graduating from Simmons, she began to work at Emerson College in their Archives and Special Collections for several years. After working for Emerson, Rosalie packed up her life and moved to the Midwest, a transition that she says was rather smooth when you think about moving from Boston, Massachusetts to Ames, Iowa! While she sometimes misses the city, there are pieces of Iowa that make up for the lost hustle and bustle, like farmer’s markets and ample running trails.

The Special Collections and University Archives here at Iowa State are always working on bringing in fun new projects to work on, which is Rosalie’s favorite part of the job. Something she wishes the public would know about Special Collections and Archives is that they are not scary! They love when researches come in and use the collections that they work so hard to make accessible for everyone. When Rosalie is not working up in SCUA, she can be found hanging out with her dog, cooking something up, or just laid back enjoying a good book.


Welcome Cassandra!

Hello everyone! We are very excited to introduce our new Curation Services Student Writer, Cassandra Anderson!

Photograph of white female student, long hair with glasses, close-up in a library office setting (cubicle & book shelves filled with books visible in the background).

Photograph courtesy of Cassandra Anderson.

Cassandra grew up in Creston, Iowa where she spent a lot of her time in her mother’s elementary/middle school library. When she wasn’t there, she could be found hanging out in her grandmother’s libraries in Urbandale, Iowa. Cassandra is hoping to be the third generation of library workers in her family. She is currently a senior here at Iowa State where she is studying English. After she graduates she hopes to attend a graduate program to study library science or archives management. Growing up she occasionally was able to attend the annual American Library Association conferences with her mother and grandmother, and was even able to attend the most recent one in New Orleans this summer. While there, she sat in on a discussion lead by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden and Archivist of the United States David Ferriero, and was incredibly excited to learn about her future career! Cassandra will be writing blog posts and sharing interesting finds on our social media accounts. When she is not writing for us, she is working as the student assistant on the AvIAn project here in the library. Welcome Cassandra, we are excited to have you!


Activist Agriculture: Farm Protest in Iowa, 1929-1969

Next Wednesday, our new exhibition, Activist Agriculture: Farm Protest in Iowa, 1929-1969, opens. From 10:45 – 12:15 July 18, our exhibition team will talk about the exhibit process for the physical and online exhibits. The exhibition team at the Iowa State University Library includes staff from Special Collections & University Archives, as well as members of the Preservation Department & Digital Initiatives. Don’t miss out on a perfect opportunity to learn what goes on behind the scenes!

I thought it would be fun to ask the curators some questions about this exhibit. This exhibition is curated by Amy, Olivia, & Kim. Amy is our rare books & manuscripts archivist, and Olivia is our reference coordinator. Kim is the digital initiatives archivist.

What do you hope visitors get out of the exhibit?

Amy: In this exhibit, we highlight the stories of activism on the part of both farm owners and migrant farm workers in Iowa. Previous to working on the exhibit, I knew very little about the stories of migrant farm workers in Iowa, and I suspect that my case is not unusual. So, I hope visitors spend some time examining both of those elements in the exhibit, comparing and contrasting the motivations and experiences of both farmers and farm workers.

Olivia: I hope that visitors get a sense of the variety of actions taken by farmers in order to influence policy and prices.  The farmers and various farming groups did not take a “one size fits all” approach to activism.

Kim: I would like visitors to think critically about agency and its relationship to activism. I think this exhibit will show both activism to secure economic and political agency, as well as activism facilitated by social and cultural agency. I would also like visitors to be more aware of the desperation and difficult lived experiences that led farmers and farm workers to take powerful and controversial action. I also hope that visitors just find the exhibit interesting and might be inspired to learn more about the topics presented here.

What was the most interesting thing you learned doing this exhibit (can be Farm Protest related or exhibit process related)?

Amy:  I spent the most time researching and selecting items to tell the story of the National Farmers Organization (NFO) holding actions, and I was struck by the whole development of the organization and its activism in the 1960s. It is a period of American history known for its general unrest and activism on many fronts–Civil Rights, the anti-war movement, Counterculture. It is interesting to look at the activism of NFO as a piece of this broader tapestry of activism, but it is an important story on its own and one that is not widely known.

Olivia: It was interesting to see the range of factors that can affect a farmer’s ability to make a living.  Of course, weather would usually be the first thing to come to mind.  However, there are so many other forces including legislation and who gets the money when farm commodity prices increase (is if the farmer or the grocery store?)  What I learned about the exhibit process is just how much work goes into making an exhibit.  Of course there’s the fun part of choosing artifacts, but there’s a lot of research to do ahead of time and thinking about how the different interesting artifacts fit together to tell a larger story.

Kim: I was surprised by the sheer numbers of people who turned out at the blockades and strikes. I also learned how to use some new software – QGIS for building the map (with KML encoding that I learned at a workshop last year), and building timelines from scratch in Adobe Illustrator.

What is your favorite item in the exhibit (online or physical)?

Amy: I particularly like all the NFO milk holding action photos because they are visually powerful. One in particular stands out. It shows a family walking through a field in which a lot of cars are parked, heading towards a gathering of people in the distance. Six children are walking with their father, and two kids at the front of the group are carrying a sign that reads, “We like farming but can’t do it for fun alone. Support NFO.” It evokes the sense of just how much entire families were involved in the protests–and how the whole families’ livelihoods were at stake.

Olivia: My favorite item is the political cartoon of the cow sitting on her tail so that the veterinarian can’t test her for tuberculosis.  It is lighthearted, but sends a strong message.  Oh yeah, and the cow is pretty cute, too!

Kim: This is an easy one – I’ve been enamored of the Al Loveland campaign comic book since we found it. It adds a splash of color to the exhibit and some of the panels work really well as tiny vignettes of depression-era and New Deal farm experiences. We’re displaying it open to a particular page in the physical exhibit, but visitors can read the entire comic book online.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

As exhibition coordinator, I keep track of deadlines and move the process forward. There are many moving parts to the exhibition process, and I coordinate them so that other parts of the exhibition team can complete the work they need to do in order for the exhibition to open on time. My favorite part of this process is the installation of the window display. Since our Pammel Court exhibition in 2017, we have partnered with ISU Printing Services to include our department windows in our exhibits. Curators select images and with the much appreciated assistance of Jody Kalvik , program coordinator in the Library’s Instruction department, develop graphics for the window. Then it is sent over to Printing Services and after each window is printed, they take 24 hours to dry. Then I schedule a time for the Printing Services team, managed by Lorraine Petersen, to install the windows. The installation of the windows is my favorite part because it marks the beginning of a new exhibition and also is a prominent piece of the exhibit. When it is done, I am able to breathe a sign of relief.

Please drop by Wednesday, July 18, and check out our new exhibition! The exhibition team will be on hand from 10:45–12:15 to answer questions & show off the digital exhibit also in 405 Parks.


2018 4-H Youth Conference Workshop

This week the Iowa 4-H Youth Conference came to campus. This is an annual event that occurs every June. Approximately 900 teenagers descend onto Iowa State University’s campus for three days filled with workshops, speakers, community service activities, and an assortment of social events. This year, I partnered with Iowa State University Library Instruction Librarian Cara Stone and offered a workshop about preserving family history. Our goals were to help participants identify past, present, and future artifacts. We also addressed basic ways they could keep their stuff safe and provided resources for further information on both preservation resources and what cultural heritage institutions reside in the state.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We had a great time with the 4-H youths and hope they had fun also, and learned a little too, of course.


Iowa Museum Week #TBT #IowaMuseumWeek

We are smack in the middle of Iowa Museum Week so today’s #ThrowbackThursday picture is a historical photograph of the Brunnier Art Museum on campus.

Black-and-white photograph of school age children and one adult, white woman with long hair, surrounding a museum exhibit case, filled with a doll collection. Location is the Brunnier Museum on Iowa State University campus. No date.

Visitors viewing the doll collection at the Brunnier Art Museum, no date on photograph (University Photographs, box 433).

Try to make it out to a local museum this week. If you can’t manage a visit, you can celebrate with them on Facebook!

Iowa museum factoids:

  • Iowa’s approximately 400 museums range from arboretums to zoos. While museums are different in many ways, they are all educational collecting organizations, providing careful stewardship for future generations.
  • Iowa museums offer over 60,000 public programs every year, many of them free.
  • By providing learning in an “active” environment, museums offer all ages unique ways to learn, fostering lifelong interests. Active learning environments such as those offered by museums allow for choice and encourage problem solving, critical thinking skills, and creativity.
  • The American Alliance of Museums reports that the nonprofit arts and cultural industry annually generates over $135 billion in economic activity, supporting more than 4.1 million full-time jobs and returning over $22 billion in local, state, and federal tax revenue.

 


Celebrate Pride: “It is OK to be yourself and who you are”

June is LGBTQ Pride Month. Pride month is celebrated in June to honor the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots that took place in New York City in 1969. The Stonewall Riots were a significant development in the fight for equal rights for the LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning or Queer) community. In honor of Pride Month, here is a page from the 1994 Bomb, Iowa State University’s yearbook, that describes the National Coming out Day rally on campus on October 11, 1994.

Caption for photograph of a white male in top right part of page: lgb student services coordinator christopher james speaks about being bisexual at coming out day. photo by mike king. "LGBA: taking the next step" by theresa wilson. While diversity became a dominant issue on campus, the issue of acceptance for lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans gender persons remained hidden. At least it did until one day in October when the LGB community took center stage. The Lesbian/ Gay /Bisexual Alliance held its annual Coming Out Day Oct. II, in conjuntion with National Coming Out Day. Approximately 100 students, faculty and staff attended a rally south of the Campanile to show their support for the LGB community. Speakers encouraged people to "come out" to friends, relatives and acquaintances. The theme of the event was "Taking the Next Step." LGBA Vice President Chuck Bevolo, one of the organizers of Coming Out Day, said the theme had many connotations. "It entails a lot of different things," Bevolo said. "It means something different for each person. Taking the next step can mean coming out of the closet to yourself and to your friends. It can mean telling someone else you care about what you have already told your family and friends so they know what you do. It can mean becoming active. It involves the coming out process, a process of steps that you must take one at a time." People from throughout the campus and the state of Iowa spoke at the rally. Bill Crews, mayor of Melborne, Iowa, encouraged people to be active in supporting the LGB community. Celia Naylor-Ojurongbe, adviser for the Margaret Sloss Women's Center, read a poem written for the rally. Speakers discussed the different aspects of being a lebian, gay, bisexual or trans gender person. LGBA also presented a Tuesday Topic session at the Margaret Sloss Women's Center and held a social dinner at Pizza Kitchens. Jeanine Bessette, LGBS adviser, attended the rally and said she found comfort in being surrounded by people who supported her lifestyle. "The Coming Out Day rally is a day of celebration in my life and a day that says it is OK to be who you are. It gives the opportunity to come out to people and let people know. It gives the LGB community a chance to celebrate who they are." "I really enjoyed the speakers from all different walks of life. They talked about their personal experiences. Allies talked about their support and working for our rights. I just liked the atmosphere." Bevolo said one message dominated the rally. "The predominant message was that it is OK to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and it is OK to be yourself and who you are. Doing that means being honest with yourself, your friends and your family. It is not always easy and it is not always pleasant, but it must be done, and people are willing to help."

 

At the end of the page, Chuck Bevolo, the LGBA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Alliance) Vice President said:

The predominant message was that it is OK to be lesbian, gay or bisexual and it is OK to be yourself and who you are.

Below are some current Iowa State University LGBTQIAA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, Asexual, Ally)  student organizations and resources:

The Iowa State University LGBTQA+ Faculty & Staff Association was created for faculty & staff who are supportive of the LGBTQ+ community.

For more information on the history of LGBTQ+ student organizations at Iowa State, check out a prior blog post “LGBT Month” written in 2015. Or drop by our reading room to conduct more research. We’re open Monday-Friday from 9-5.