#TBT Martin Luther King, Jr. in Ames

Image of Martin Luther King, Jr. with the following text as introduction: Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr. The Internationally recognized humanist, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., first gained world-wide acclaim through his leadership of the Negro citizens' boycott of segregated buses in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1957. In the same year the Gallup Poll revealed that he was one of the most admired religious leaders of the world, and Time Magazine selected him one of the ten outstanding personalities of the year. At the present time Dr. King is pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church of Montgomery, and president of the Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc. Dr. King has chosen as his Friday night topic, "The Moral Challenges of a New Age", and will include in his presentation views concerning the racial problem in the United States and the colonial struggle in Asia and Africa, looking at both from a theological standpoint. Dr. King, although only 30 years of age, holds the Ph.D. degree in Systematic Theology from Boston University. He has been the recipient of three earned degrees plus five honorary degrees. Within the period of three years, 1956-1958, Dr. King has been granted 37 major awards and citations, including among these being the Windy City Press Club's, "Man of the Year", "The Citation for Distinguished Christian Service", from the National Fraternal Council of Churches, U.S.A., and the "Social Justice Award", from the Religion and Labor Foundation, New York.

Pages from the 1960 Religion-in-Life Week program introducing Martin Luther King Jr. as the speaker for the evening of Friday, January 22, 1960. (Iowa State University, Religion in Life Week records, RS 22/8/0/1, Box 2, Folder 8)

In January 1960, as part of Iowa State’s annual Religion in Life Week convocations, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., visited the Iowa State campus to deliver a speech on “The Moral Challenges of a New Age.” Sadly, we have no photographs or recordings of the speech, but a typescript of the speech exists in the archives, as does the program for the 1960 Religion-in-Life Week. The image above was taken from the program. If only it were possible to travel back in time, I would love to find myself sitting in the audience in the Great Hall the evening Dr. King came to ISU.

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